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Identifying womens preferences for treatment of urinary tract infection: a discrete choice experiment

Por: van der Worp · H. · Brandenbarg · D. · Boek · P. A. · Braams · J. H. W. · Brink · L. J. F. · Keupers · J. · Blanker · M. H.
Objective

To identify the preferences of women regarding management of urinary tract infections (UTIs).

Design

A discrete choice experiment of the preferences for certain treatment attributes was conducted by survey. Attributes included treatment duration, time to complaint resolution, complication risk, side effect risk and contribution to antimicrobial resistance.

Setting

General population in the Netherlands, recruited via social media.

Participants

Women aged 18 years or older.

Primary and secondary outcome measures

The primary outcome was the relative importance of the attributes for treatment choice, using a conditional logit model. The secondary outcome was the heterogeneity in these preferences.

Results

The discrete choice experiment was completed by 833 women. Most attributes were important to decisions for UTI treatment. Women were willing to accept management with, for example, a higher chance of complications or longer time to resolution, if it could help avoid antimicrobial resistance. However, there was heterogeneity in the preferences. Women who had one previous UTI had a stronger preference for faster symptom resolution compared with those who had no previous UTI. Younger women also preferred faster symptom resolution. Finally, women with a low or middle education level gave less importance to preventing antimicrobial resistance than women with a high education level.

Conclusions

The current study indicated that a considerable part of women valued alternatives to antimicrobial treatment and were prepared to tolerate management that was less optimal in certain respects to avoid antimicrobial treatment.

Association of occupation with the daily physical activity and sedentary behaviour of middle-aged workers in Korea: a cross-sectional study based on data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

Por: Sung · J. H. · Son · S. R. · Baek · S.-H. · Kim · B.-J.
Objectives

The WHO recommends that adults engage in regular moderate-to-vigorous physical activities (MVPAs) and muscle-strengthening activities (MSA), and minimise sedentary behaviour. This study aimed to determine the association of occupation with MVPA, MSA and sedentary behaviour in middle-aged Korean workers.

Design and setting

A cross-sectional study using data from the seventh Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2016–2018).

Participants

Workers aged between 40 and 69 years in Korea (n=6359).

Outcome measures

Population-weighted proportions not meeting the MVPA (7 hours/day) were calculated, and their associations with sociodemographic and work-related variables were assessed using multiple logistic regression analyses. Additionally, the estimated time spent on MVPA, MSA and sedentary behaviour according to the occupation categories (white-collar, pink-collar and blue-collar) was calculated using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA).

Results

The MVPA level did not show a significant difference across the occupation categories. Blue-collar workers showed significantly lower MSA participation than white-collar and pink-collar workers (male, p=0.006; female, p=0.004; by ANCOVA). High sedentary behaviour was significantly associated with white-collar occupations (p

Conclusion

A number of work-related factors were associated with PA levels and sedentary behaviour in middle-aged workers. The workplace is one of the critical elements to intervene in health promotion strategies.

Healthcare utilisation of patients with cholecystolithiasis in primary care: a multipractice comparative analysis

Por: Thunnissen · F. M. · Drager · L. D. · Braak · B. · Drenth · J. P. H. · van Laarhoven · C. J. H. M. · Schers · H. J. · de Reuver · P. R.
Objectives

To examine general practitioners’ (GP) management of cholecystolithiasis and to evaluate persisting abdominal complaints in the years after the diagnosis.

Design

Retrospective analysis of registry data and a subset of individual medical records.

Setting

Seventeen primary care practices affiliated with the Radboudumc Practice Based Research Network in the Netherlands.

Participants

633 patients with cholecystolithiasis diagnosed between 2012 and 2016.

Primary and secondary outcome measures

The primary outcome of this study was the healthcare utilisation of patients with cholecystolithiasis diagnosed by the GP in terms of referrals to secondary care, laboratory diagnostics, prescribed medication and the prevalence of concomitant abdominal-related diagnoses in a time interval of 3 years before and 3 years after diagnosis of cholecystolithiasis. For secondary outcomes, electronic medical records were studied from seven practices to assess emergency department visits, operation rates and repeat visits for persistent abdominal symptoms. We compared the non-referred group with the referred group.

Results

In 57% of patients, concomitant abdominal-related diagnoses were recorded besides the diagnosis cholecystolithiasis. In-depth analyses of 294 patients showed a referral rate of 79.3% (n=233); 62.9% (n=185) underwent cholecystectomy. After referral, 55.4% (129/233) returned to the GP for persistent abdominal symptoms. Patients returning after referral were more often treated for another abdominal-related diagnosis before cholecystolithiasis was recorded (51.9% vs 28.8%, p

Conclusions

The majority of patients in general practice with gallstones are referred and undergo cholecystectomy. Patients with concomitant abdominal-related diagnoses are likely to return to their physician. GPs should inform patients about these outcomes to improve the shared decision-making process before gallbladder surgery.

Observational study of the relative efficacy of insulin-glucose treatment for hyperkalaemia in patients with liver cirrhosis

Por: Lim · A. K. H. · Crnobrnja · L. · Metlapalli · M. · Jiang · C. · Wang · R. S. H. · Pham · J. H. · Abasszade · J. H.
Objectives

To determine if liver cirrhosis is associated with reduced efficacy of insulin-glucose treatment in moderate to severe hyperkalaemia.

Design

Retrospective, cohort study.

Setting

Two secondary and one tertiary care hospital at a large metropolitan healthcare network in Melbourne, Australia.

Participants

This study included 463 adults with a mean age of 68.7±15.8 years, comprising 79 patients with cirrhosis and 384 without cirrhosis as controls, who received standard insulin-glucose treatment for a serum potassium ≥6.0 mmol/L from October 2016 to March 2020. Patients were excluded if they received an insulin infusion, or if there was inadequate follow-up data for at least 6 hours after IDT due to death, lost to follow-up or inadequate biochemistry monitoring. The mean Model for End-stage Liver Disease score in patients with cirrhosis was 22.2±7.5, and the distribution of the Child-Pugh score for cirrhosis was: class A (24%), class B (46%), class C (30%).

Outcome measures

The primary outcome was the degree of potassium lowering and the secondary outcome was the proportion of patients who achieved normokalaemia, within 6 hours of treatment.

Results

The mean pretreatment potassium for the cohort was 6.57±0.52 mmol/L. After insulin-glucose treatment, mean potassium lowering was 0.84±0.58 mmol/L in patients with cirrhosis compared with 1.33±0.75 mmol/L for controls (p

Conclusions

Our observational data suggest reduced efficacy of insulin-glucose treatment for hyperkalaemia in patients with cirrhosis.

Phase II multicentre, double-blind, randomised trial of ustekinumab in adolescents with new-onset type 1 diabetes (USTEK1D): trial protocol

Por: Gregory · J. W. · Carter · K. · Cheung · W. Y. · Holland · G. · Bowen-Morris · J. · Luzio · S. · Dunseath · G. · Tree · T. · Yang · J. H. M. · Marwaha · A. · Ali · M. A. · Bashir · N. · Hutchings · H. A. · Fegan · G. W. · Stenson · R. · Hiles · S. · Marques-Jones · S. · Brown · A. · Tatovi
Introduction

Most individuals newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have 10%–20% of beta-cell function remaining at the time of diagnosis. Preservation of residual beta-cell function at diagnosis may improve glycaemic control and reduce longer-term complications.

Immunotherapy has the potential to preserve endogenous beta-cell function and thereby improve metabolic control even in poorly compliant individuals. We propose to test ustekinumab (STELARA), a targeted and well-tolerated therapy that may halt T-cell and cytokine-mediated destruction of beta-cells in the pancreas at the time of diagnosis.

Methods and analysis

This is a double-blind phase II study to assess the safety and efficacy of ustekinumab in 72 children and adolescents aged 12–18 with new-onset T1D.

Participants should have evidence of residual functioning beta-cells (serum C-peptide level >0.2nmol/L in the mixed-meal tolerance test (MMTT) and be positive for at least one islet autoantibody (GAD, IA-2, ZnT8) to be eligible.

Participants will be given ustekinumab/placebo subcutaneously at weeks 0, 4 and 12, 20, 28, 36 and 44 in a dose depending on the body weight and will be followed for 12 months after dose 1.

MMTTs will be used to measure the efficacy of ustekinumab for preserving C-peptide area under the curve at week 52 compared with placebo. Secondary objectives include further investigations into the efficacy and safety of ustekinumab, patient and parent questionnaires, alternative methods for measuring insulin production and exploratory mechanistic work.

Ethics and dissemination

This trial received research ethics approval from the Wales Research Ethics Committee 3 in September 2018 and began recruiting in December 2018.

The results will be disseminated using highly accessed, peer-reviewed medical journals and presented at conferences.

Trial registration number

ISRCTN14274380.

Gastrointestinal recovery after surgery: protocol for a systematic review

Por: Kovoor · J. G. · Stretton · B. · Jacobsen · J. H. W. · Gupta · A. K. · Ovenden · C. D. · Hewitt · J. N. · Glynatsis · J. M. · Edwards · S. · Campbell · K. · Asokan · G. P. · Tivey · D. R. · Babidge · W. J. · Rayner · C. K. · Anthony · A. A. · Trochsler · M. I. · Horowitz · M. · Hewett
Introduction

Gastrointestinal recovery after surgery is of worldwide significance. Postoperative gastrointestinal dysfunction is multifaceted and known to represent a major source of postoperative morbidity, however, its significance to postoperative care across all surgical procedures is unknown. The complexity of postoperative gastrointestinal recovery is poorly defined within gastrointestinal surgery, and even less so outside this field. To inform the clinical care of surgical patients worldwide, this systematic review and meta-analysis will aim to characterise the duration of postoperative gastrointestinal recovery that can be expected across all surgical procedures and determine the associations between factors that may affect this.

Methods and analysis

MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library and CINAHL will be searched for studies reporting the time to first postoperative passage of stool after any surgical procedure. We will screen records, extract data and assess risk of bias in duplicate. Forest plots will be constructed for time to postoperative gastrointestinal recovery, as assessed by various outcome measures. Because of potential heterogeneity, a random-effects model will be used throughout the meta-analysis. Funnel plots will be used to test for publication bias. Meta-regressions will be undertaken where the outcome is the mean time to first postoperative passage of stool, with potential predictors and confounders being patient characteristics, postoperative outcomes and surgical factors.

Ethics and dissemination

This study will not involve human or animal subjects and, thus, does not require ethics approval. The outcomes will be disseminated via publication in peer-reviewed scientific journal(s) and presentations at scientific conferences.

PROSPERO registration number

CRD42021256210.

Reducing antibiotic prescribing by enhancing communication of general practitioners with their immigrant patients: protocol for a randomised controlled trial (PARCA study)

Por: Lescure · D. · van der Velden · J. · Nieboer · D. · van Oorschot · W. · Brouwer · R. · Huijser van Reenen · N. · Tjon-A-Tsien · A. · Erdem · O. · Vos · M. · van der Velden · A. · Richardus · J. H. · Voeten · H.
Introduction

Although antibiotic use and antimicrobial resistance in the Netherlands is comparatively low, inappropriate prescription of antibiotics is substantial, mainly for respiratory tract infections (RTIs). General practitioners (GPs) experience pressure from patients with an immigration background to prescribe antibiotics and have difficulty communicating in a culturally sensitive way. Multifaceted interventions including communication skills training for GPs are shown to be most effective in reducing antibiotic prescription. The PARCA study aims to reduce the number of antibiotic prescriptions for RTIs through implementing a culturally sensitive communication intervention for GPs and evaluate it in a randomised controlled trial (RCT).

Methods and analysis

A non-blinded RCT including 58 GPs (29 for each arm). The intervention consists of: (1) An E-learning with 4 modules of 10–15 min each; (2) A face-to-face training session in (intercultural) communication skills including role plays with a training actor and (3) Availability of informative patient-facing materials that use simple words (A2/B1 level) in multiple languages. The primary outcome measure is the number of dispensed antibiotic courses qualifying for RTIs in primary care, per 1000 registered patients. The secondary outcome measure is the number of all dispensed antibiotic courses, per 1000 registered patients. The intervention arm will receive the training in Autumn 2021, followed by an observation period of 6 winter months for which numbers of antibiotics will be collected for both trial arms. The GPs/practices in the control arm can attend the training after the observation period.

Ethics and dissemination

The study protocol was approved by the Medical Ethics Review Committee of Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam (MEC-2020-0142). The results of the trial will be published in international peer-reviewed scientific journals and will be disseminated through national and international congresses. The project is funded by The Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development (ZonMw).

Trial registration number

NL9450.

Observational cohort study of the triggers, diagnoses and outcomes of the medical emergency team (MET) response in adult psychiatry inpatients colocated with acute medical services in Australia

Por: Azraai · M. · Pham · J. H. · Looi · W. F. · Wirth · D. · Ng · A. S. L. · Babu · U. · Saluja · B. · Lim · A. K. H.
Objectives

Medical emergencies in psychiatric inpatients are challenging due to the model of care and limited medical resources. The study aims were to determine the triggers and outcomes of a medical emergency team (MET) call in psychiatric wards, and the risk factors for MET activation and mortality.

Design

Retrospective multisite cohort study.

Setting

Psychiatry units colocated with acute medical services at three major metropolitan hospitals in Melbourne, Australia.

Participants

We studied 487 adult inpatients who experienced a total of 721 MET calls between January 2015 and January 2020. Patients were relatively young (mean age, 45 years) and had few medical comorbidities, but a high prevalence of smoking, excessive alcohol intake and illicit drug use.

Outcome measures

We performed a descriptive analysis of the triggers and outcomes (transfer rates, investigations, final diagnosis) of MET calls. We used logistic regression to determine the factors associated with the primary outcome of inpatient mortality, and the secondary outcome of the need for specific medical treatment compared with simple observation.

Results

The most common MET triggers were a reduced Glasgow Coma Scale, tachycardia and hypotension, and 49% of patients required transfer. The most frequent diagnosis was a drug adverse effect or toxidrome, followed by infection and dehydration. There was a strong association between a leave of absence and MET calls, tachycardia and the final diagnosis of drug adverse effects. Mortality occurred in 3% after MET calls. Several baseline and MET clinical variables were associated with mortality but a model with age (per 10 years, OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.01) and hypoxia (OR 3.59, 95% CI 1.43 to 9.04) independently predicted mortality.

Conclusion

Vigilance is required in patients returning from day leave, and drug adverse effects remain a challenging problem in psychiatric units. Hypoxic older patients with cardiovascular comorbidity have a higher risk of death.

Intake of marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and the risk of rheumatoid arthritis: protocol for a cohort study using data from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort and Danish health registers

Por: Soussi · B. G. · Bork · C. S. · Kristensen · S. · Lundbye-Christensen · S. · Duch · K. · Cordtz · R. L. · Christensen · J. H. · Schmidt · E. B. · Dreyer · L.
Introduction

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory joint disease with multifactorial aetiology. Smoking is a well-established lifestyle risk factor, but diet may also have an impact on the risk of RA. Intake of the major marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in particular eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been hypothesised to lower the risk of RA due to their anti-inflammatory effects, although based on limited knowledge. Therefore, we aim to investigate the associations between dietary intake of EPA and DHA and the risk of incident RA.

Methods and analysis

A cohort study. The follow-up design will be based on data from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort, which was established between 1993 and 1997. The participants will be followed through record linkage using nationwide registers including the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Patient Registry and the Danish National Prescription Registry using the unique Civil Personal Registration number. Time-to-event analyses will be conducted with RA as the outcome of interest. The participants will be followed from inclusion until date of RA diagnosis, death, emigration or end of follow-up. HRs with 95% CIs obtained using Cox proportional hazard regression models, with age as underlying time scale and adjustment for established and potential risk factors, will be used as measures of association.

Ethics and dissemination

The study has been approved by the Data Protection Committee of Northern Jutland, Denmark (2019-87) and the North Denmark Region Committee on Health Research Ethics (N-20190031). Study results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals and presentations at international conferences.

Barriers to follow-up after an abnormal cervical cancer screening result and the role of male partners: a qualitative study

Por: Chapola · J. · Lee · F. · Bula · A. · Mapanje · C. · Phiri · B. R. · Kamtuwange · N. · Tsidya · M. · Tang · J. H. · Chinula · L.
Introduction

Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among women in Malawi, but preventable through screening. Malawi primarily uses visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) for screening, however, a follow-up for positive screening results remains a major barrier, in rural areas. We interviewed women who underwent a community-based screen-and-treat campaign that offered same-day treatment with thermocoagulation, a heat-based ablative procedure for VIA-positive lesions, to understand the barriers in accessing post-treatment follow-up and the role of male partners in contributing to, or overcoming these barriers.

Methods

We conducted in-depths interviews with 17 women recruited in a pilot study that evaluated the safety and acceptability of community-based screen-and-treat programme using VIA and thermocoagulation for cervical cancer prevention in rural Lilongwe, Malawi. Ten of the women interviewed presented for post-treatment follow-up at the healthcare facility and seven did not. The interviews were analysed for thematic content surrounding barriers for attending for follow-up and role of male partners in screening.

Results

Transportation was identified as a major barrier to post-thermocoagulation follow-up appointment, given long distances to the healthcare facility. Male partners were perceived as both a barrier for some, that is, not supportive of 6-week post-thermocoagulation abstinence recommendation, and as an important source of support for others, that is, encouraging follow-up attendance, providing emotional support to maintaining post-treatment abstinence and as a resource in overcoming transportation barriers. Regardless, the majority of women desired more male partner involvement in cervical cancer screening.

Conclusion

Despite access to same-day treatment, long travel distances to health facilities for post-treatment follow-up visits remained a major barrier for women in rural Lilongwe. Male partners were identified both as a barrier to, and an important source of support for accessing and completing the screen-and-treat programme. To successfully eliminate cervical cancer in Malawi, it is imperative to understand the day-to-day barriers women face in accessing preventative care.

Evaluating associations of joint swelling, joint stiffness and joint pain with physical activity in first-degree relatives of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: Studies of the Aetiology of Rheumatoid Arthritis (SERA), a prospective cohort study

Por: Hughes-Austin · J. M. · Ix · J. H. · Ward · S. R. · Weisman · M. H. · ODell · J. R. · Mikuls · T. R. · Buckner · J. H. · Gregersen · P. K. · Keating · R. M. · Demoruelle · M. K. · Deane · K. D. · Holers · V. M. · Norris · J. M.
Objective

Physical activity (PA) in preclinical rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with lower RA risk and disease severity. As joint signs and symptoms of inflammatory arthritis serve as a barrier to PA in RA, it is important to consider whether they affect PA in the time prior to RA. Therefore, we investigated whether joint swelling, stiffness or pain were associated with PA in first-degree relatives (FDRs) of patients with RA, a population at higher risk for future RA.

Design

Prospective study design.

Setting

We recruited FDRs of patients with RA from academic centres, Veterans’ hospitals and rheumatology clinics or through responses to advertising from six sites across the USA.

Participants

We evaluated associations of joint stiffness, joint swelling and joint pain with PA time in 268 FDRs with ≥2 visits over an average 1.2 years. Clinicians confirmed joint swelling. Participants self-reported joint stiffness and/or pain.

Primary outcome measures

PA during a typical 24-hour day was quantified via questionnaire, weighted to reflect metabolic expenditure, where 24 hours was the minimum PA time. Linear mixed models evaluated associations between symptoms and change in PA over time, adjusting for age, sex, race, body mass index, smoking and RA-related autoantibodies.

Results

Average weighted PA time was 37±7 hours. In the cross-sectional analysis, PA time was 1.3±0.9 hours higher in FDRs reporting joint pain (p=0.15); and 0.8±1.6 and 0.4±1 hours lower in FDRs with joint swelling (p=0.60) and stiffness (p=0.69), respectively. Longitudinally, adjusting for baseline PA time, baseline symptoms were not significantly associated with changes in PA time. However, on average over time, joint stiffness and pain were associated with lower PA time (pinteraction=0.0002, pinteraction=0.002), and joint swelling was associated with higher PA time (pinteraction

Conclusion

Baseline symptoms did not predict future PA time, but on average over time, joint symptoms influenced PA time.

IL-23 blockade with guselkumab potentially modifies psoriasis pathogenesis: rationale and study protocol of a phase 3b, randomised, double-blind, multicentre study in participants with moderate-to-severe plaque-type psoriasis (GUIDE)

Por: Eyerich · K. · Weisenseel · P. · Pinter · A. · Schäkel · K. · Asadullah · K. · Wegner · S. · Munoz-Elias · E. J. · Bartz · H. · Taut · F. J. H. · Reich · K.
Background

Guselkumab is an interleukin (IL)-23 pathway blocker with proven efficacy in patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Early intervention with guselkumab may result in changes to the clinical disease course versus later intervention.

Methods and analysis

Here we present the rationale and design of a phase 3b, randomised, double-blind, multicentre study (GUIDE), comparing treatment effects of guselkumab in patients with short (≤2 years) or longer (>2 years) duration of plaque-type psoriasis, measured from first appearance of psoriatic plaques. Participants achieving skin clearance (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI)=0) by week 20 and maintaining complete clearance at week 28 visit (‘super-responders’ (SRe)) will be randomised to continue approved maintenance dosing every 8 weeks (q8w) versus an investigational maintenance dosing interval of 16 weeks (q16w) until week 68. Primary endpoint: proportion of participants in the q8w vs q16w arms with absolute PASI

Ethics and dissemination

Approval obtained from ethics committee Medical Council Hamburg, Germany (PVN5925). GUIDE is compliant with the Declaration of Helsinki.

Trial registration number

Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT03818035). All primary endpoint results (prespecified analyses) will be submitted to peer-reviewed, international journals within 18 months after primary completion date.

Egocentric social network characteristics and cardiovascular risk among patients with hypertension or diabetes in western Kenya: a cross-sectional analysis from the BIGPIC trial

Por: Ruchman · S. G. · Delong · A. K. · Kamano · J. H. · Bloomfield · G. S. · Chrysanthopoulou · S. A. · Fuster · V. · Horowitz · C. R. · Kiptoo · P. · Matelong · W. · Mugo · R. · Naanyu · V. · Orango · V. · Pastakia · S. D. · Valente · T. W. · Hogan · J. W. · Vedanthan · R.
Objectives

Management of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an urgent challenge in low-income and middle-income countries, and interventions may require appraisal of patients’ social networks to guide implementation. The purpose of this study is to determine whether egocentric social network characteristics (SNCs) of patients with chronic disease in western Kenya are associated with overall CVD risk and individual CVD risk factors.

Design

Cross-sectional analysis of enrollment data (2017–2018) from the Bridging Income Generation with GrouP Integrated Care trial. Non-overlapping trust-only, health advice-only and multiplex (trust and health advice) egocentric social networks were elicited for each participant, and SNCs representing social cohesion were calculated.

Setting

24 communities across four counties in western Kenya.

Participants

Participants (n=2890) were ≥35 years old with diabetes (fasting glucose ≥7 mmol/L) or hypertension.

Primary and secondary outcomes

We hypothesised that SNCs would be associated with CVD risk status (QRISK3 score). Secondary outcomes were individual CVD risk factors.

Results

Among the 2890 participants, 2020 (70%) were women, and mean (SD) age was 60.7 (12.1) years. Forty-four per cent of participants had elevated QRISK3 score (≥10%). No relationship was observed between QRISK3 level and SNCs. In unadjusted comparisons, participants with any individuals in their trust network were more likely to report a good than a poor diet (41% vs 21%). SNCs for the trust and multiplex networks accounted for a substantial fraction of variation in measures of dietary quality and physical activity (statistically significant via likelihood ratio test, adjusted for false discovery rate).

Conclusion

SNCs indicative of social cohesion appear to be associated with individual behavioural CVD risk factors, although not with overall CVD risk score. Understanding how SNCs of patients with chronic diseases relate to modifiable CVD risk factors could help inform network-based interventions.

Trial registration number

ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02501746; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02501746.

A longitudinal exploration of the relationship between obesity, and long term health condition with presenteeism in Australian workplaces, 2006-2018

by Syed Afroz Keramat, Khorshed Alam, Jeff Gow, Stuart J. H. Biddle

Background

Obesity and long term health condition (LTHC) are major public health concerns that have an impact on productivity losses at work. Little is known about the longitudinal association between obesity and LTHC with impaired productivity.

Objective

This study aims to explore the longitudinal association between obesity and LTHC with presenteeism or working while sick.

Design

Longitudinal research design

Setting

Australian workplaces

Methods

This study pooled individual-level data of 111,086 employees collected in wave 6 through wave 18 from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey. The study used a Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) model with logistic link function to estimate the association.

Results

The findings suggest that overweight (Odds Ratios [OR]: 1.09, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.05–1.14), obesity (OR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.31–1.45), and LTHC (OR: 3.03, 95% CI: 2.90–3.16) are significantly positively associated with presenteeism.

Conclusions

The longitudinal association between obesity and LTHC with presenteeism among Australian employees implies that interventions to improve workers' health and well-being will reduce the risk of presenteeism at work.

Attitude and beliefs about the social environment associated with chemsex among MSM visiting STI clinics in the Netherlands: An observational study

by Ymke J. Evers, Jill J. H. Geraets, Geneviève A. F. S. Van Liere, Christian J. P. A. Hoebe, Nicole H. T. M. Dukers-Muijrers

Background

Drug use during sex, ‘chemsex’, is common among men who have sex with men (MSM) and related to sexual and mental health harms. This study assessed associations between chemsex and a wide range of determinants among MSM visiting STI clinics to increase understanding of characteristics and beliefs of MSM practicing chemsex.

Methods

In 2018, 785 MSM were recruited at nine Dutch STI clinics; 368 (47%) fully completed the online questionnaire. All participants reported to have had sex in the past six months. Chemsex was defined as using cocaine, crystal meth, designer drugs, GHB/GBL, ketamine, speed or XTC/MDMA during sex in the past six months. Associations between chemsex and psychosocial determinants, socio-demographics, sexual behaviour and using tobacco or alcohol were assessed by multivariable logistic regression analyses.

Results

Chemsex was reported by 44% of MSM (161/368) and was not associated with socio-demographics. Independent determinants were ‘believing that the majority of friends/sex partners use drugs during sex’ (descriptive norm) (aOR: 1.95, 95%CI: 1.43–2.65), ‘believing that sex is more fun when using drugs’ (attitude) (aOR: 2.06, 95%CI: 1.50–2.84), using tobacco (aOR: 2.65, 95%CI: 1.32–5.32), multiple sex partners (aOR: 2.69, 95%CI: 1.21–6.00), group sex (aOR: 4.65, 95%CI: 1.54–14.05) and using online dating platforms (aOR: 2.73, 95%CI: 1.13–6.62).

Conclusion

MSM are likely to find themselves in distinct social networks where it is the norm to use drugs when having sex and pleasure is linked to chemsex. Health services should acknowledge the social influence and pleasurable experiences to increase acceptability of strategies aimed at minimizing the possible harms of chemsex.

Investigating the effect of a symposium on sexual health care in prostate cancer among Dutch healthcare professionals

Abstract

Aims and objectives

To investigate whether a symposium aimed at healthcare professionals in the uro‐oncological field changes knowledge, competence and general practice regarding sexual dysfunction after prostate cancer treatment.

Background

Sexual dysfunction is not frequently discussed by healthcare professionals; lack of knowledge and training are two of the most often reported barriers. Provision of additional training could improve knowledge, competence and general practice of healthcare professionals.

Design

Two questionnaires were used in this pre–post study to determine knowledge, competence and general practice at the time of the symposium and six months afterwards.

Methods

In order to perform repeated measures to analyse alterations among participating healthcare professionals (n = 55), the McNemar's test was used. A STROBE checklist was completed.

Results

Seventy‐three per cent (n = 40) stated that not enough attention was paid to prostate cancer‐related sexual dysfunction during their education. Nurses felt significantly less competent in discussing sexual function, advising on sexual dysfunction and actively inquiring sexual complaints compared to other healthcare professionals. After the symposium, sexual dysfunction was significantly more often discussed. No significant effects were found on knowledge on sexual dysfunction, knowledge on treatment of sexual dysfunction, competence in discussing sexual function, advising on sexual dysfunction, actively inquiring sexual complaints and rate of referral. Tools needed to address sexual dysfunction concerned written information materials (75.5%) and a website containing adequate information (56.6%).

Conclusions

The symposium had no significant influence on knowledge, competence and rate of referral in men with sexual dysfunction after prostate cancer treatment. However, sexual dysfunction was more frequently discussed after the symposium, so increase of awareness of consequences of prostate cancer treatment was achieved.

Relevance to clinical practice

Consequences of prostate cancer treatment to sexual function should be taken in consideration in daily practice; written information materials and a website containing adequate information were indicated as valuable resources to address sexual dysfunction in routine consultations.

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