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AnteayerWorldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing

The effectiveness of ERAS guidelines in reducing postoperative pain

Abstract

Background

Poorly controlled acute postsurgical pain can promote chronic opioid use and misuse long after the initial surgical procedure. Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) guidelines have shown promise in reducing opioid exposure and minimizing opioid-related side effects.

Aims

The aims of this evidence-based practice (EBP) project were to assess the ERAS literature to guide postoperative pain management practice change at an adult colorectal surgical unit, evaluate the practice change outcomes, and disseminate the findings.

Methods

A Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome, and Time (PICOT) question was established to guide an ERAS literature search. Found articles were critically appraised using the FULD Critical Appraisal Tool. Following the critical appraisal, the steps of EBP were utilized to implement an ERAS guideline for adult colorectal surgical patients in a 281-bed medical center. Outcomes of the practice change were evaluated by comparing multimodal analgesic, regional anesthesia, and opioid pain medication use before and after guideline implementation.

Results

Five articles were critically appraised for guideline development. After implementation, data demonstrated an increase in the use of multimodal analgesics and regional anesthesia and a decrease in the use of opioid pain medication. These findings were disseminated through multiple venues within the hospital, including a presentation to the stakeholders.

Linking Evidence to Action

Evidence-based strategies to reduce postoperative pain are achievable while reducing perioperative opioid consumption. Engagement of key stakeholders and timely rollout of EBP changes are important for successful implementation. ERAS guidelines with a multimodal analgesia pathway are an effective way to reduce postoperative pain and perioperative opioid consumption.

A qualitative descriptive study of the role of nurse, allied health and physician middle managers who function as knowledge brokers in hospitals

Abstract

Background

Knowledge brokers (KB) are increasingly being employed in health care to implement evidence-based practice and improve quality of care. Middle managers (MMs) may play a KB role in the implementation of an innovative or evidence-based practice in hospitals. However, how MMs' broker knowledge in hospitals and their impact on practice has not been adequately studied.

Aim

To describe the role that MMs play in brokering knowledge in hospitals and their impact.

Method

A qualitative descriptive study was conducted to generate a detailed description of MM experiences as KBs in hospitals. Data were collected using semi-structured telephone interviews with MMs in Ontario, Canada. Participants were purposively sampled to ensure variation in MM characteristics and a diverse representation of perspectives. Data were collected and analyzed concurrently using an inductive constant comparative approach.

Results

Twenty-one MMs from teaching and non-teaching hospitals participated. MMs described 10 roles and activities they enacted in hospitals that aligned with published KB roles. We found differences across professional groups and hospital type. Teaching status emerged as a potential factor relating to how MM KBs were able to function within hospitals. MMs reported enhanced patient, provider, and organizational outcomes.

Linking Evidence to Action

Middle managers may play an important KB role in the implementation of evidence-based practice in hospitals. An improved understanding of the KB roles that MMs play may be important in boosting evidence base practice in health care to ultimately improve quality of care. Administrators need a better understanding of the current KB roles and activities MMs enact as this may lead to more organizational structures to support MM KBs in health care.

Factors affecting quality of life in low‐income overweight and obese women: The mediating effects of health‐promoting behaviors

Abstract

Background

It is necessary to comprehensively consider the personal and environmental factors of women who experience overweight or obesity and low-income households (WOOL) to improve their quality of life (QoL).

Aims

The aim of this study was to test a hypothetical path model to estimate the effects of self-efficacy, psychological distress, social support, and health-promoting behaviors (HPB) on QoL and verify the mediating effects of HPB among WOOL.

Methods

A total of 151 women with a monthly household income less than 50% of the national median income at eight welfare centers in South Korea participated in this study. Data were collected from January to December 2019 and analyzed using SPSS 25.0 and Amos 23.0.

Results

The fit indices of the model were adequate (χ 2 = 0.197, p = .657; normed χ 2 = 0.197, GFI = 0.999, CFI = 1.000, NFI = 0.999, TLI = 1.000, RMSEA = 0.000, and SRMR = 0.005). Self-efficacy had significant indirect and total effects on QoL (β = 0.064, p = .004, 95% CI [0.015, 0.139]; β = 0.064, p = .004, 95% CI [0.015, 0.139]). HPB completely mediated the path of self-efficacy to QoL. Social support had significant total, direct, indirect, and total effects on QoL (β = 0.326, p = .001, 95% CI [0.010, 0.025]; β = 0.047, p = .015, 95% CI [0.008, 0.120]; β = 0.373, p = .001, 95% CI [0.015, 0.369]). HPB partially mediated the path of social support to QoL. Psychological distress had significant direct effects on QoL (β = −0.307, p = .001, 95% CI [−0.022, −0.007]). Self-efficacy, psychological distress, social support, and HPB explained 42.3% of the total variance in QoL.

Linking Evidence to Action

Integrated nursing interventions that consider self-efficacy, psychological distress, social stress, and HPB can be useful for improving the QoL of WOOL.

Issue Information

Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, Volume 19, Issue 3, Page 169-171, June 2022.

Nurse practitioner‐led lung cancer screening clinic: An evidence‐based quality improvement evaluation

Abstract

Background

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Screening for lung cancer using low-dose computed tomography of the chest (LDCT) can reduce mortality associated with lung cancer. LDCT is an under-ordered screening study.

Aims

To evaluate the use of a nurse practitioner-led lung cancer screening clinic (LCSC).

Methods

The absolute number of LDCT for lung cancer screenings obtained 12 months before implementing the nurse practitioner-led LCSC was compared to the 12 months after clinic implementation using a casual comparison design. An electronic survey was conducted to assess the LCSC key stakeholders' perceptions of the clinic.

Results

An increase of 60% in the total number of LDCT for lung cancer screenings was observed. Qualitative data obtained through stakeholder evaluation of the clinic revealed that 85% of participants (n = 13) expressed that the LCSC was addressing barriers to lung cancer screening.

Linking Evidence to Action

A dedicated nurse practitioner-led LCSC is a practical way to increase lung cancer screening by addressing established barriers to screening in the community setting.

How nursing stakeholders in the Republic of Ireland define evidence‐based practice and why it matters

Abstract

Background

Evidence-based practice (EBP) has garnered increasing exposure in professional healthcare discourse over three decades. While the term is used frequently, its interpretation varies widely. An accurate, shared understanding of what EBP means is essential to the achievement of EBP implementation in clinical practice. As part of a national study in the Republic of Ireland, nurses, midwives, educators, and students shared their personal understanding of what EBP was to them.

Aim

To establish nurses', midwives', educators', and students' knowledge and understanding of the concept of EBP in the Republic of Ireland.

Methods

In a national study exploring EBP beliefs, implementation, and organizational readiness for EBP among nurses, midwives, educators, and students, an open-ended question invited participants to explain what EBP is, in their own words. Content analysis was used to interpret participants' responses.

Results

Five themes emerged from the data from the single open-ended question: (1) varying definitions of EBP, (2) best practice, (3) nurses' and midwives' role in EBP, (4) knowledge, and (5) barriers and facilitators of EBP. The dominant finding centered on the substantial conflation of EBP with research utilization and other concepts such as quality improvement.

Linking Evidence to Action

Poor knowledge and understanding of EBP is a fundamental challenge to EBP implementation. Conflation of EBP with research utilization and other healthcare concepts is not uncommon among nurses and midwives globally and has persisted for some time. This has the potential to hinder the advancement of EBP in nursing and midwifery and, therefore, measures to enhance EBP knowledge and promote EBP implementation are key. Professional regulating bodies, educators, and clinical and educational organizations all have a role to play. The findings from this aspect of this national study offer a realistic, context-specific starting point for tailored educational interventions for clinicians, educators, and students and identify professional and organizational strategies that promote EBP as the expectation and “the way things are done here.”

Health‐promoting behaviors and self‐efficacy among nursing students in times of uncertainty

Abstract

Background

Nursing students are often faced with academic and personal stressors that threaten their Health-Promoting Behaviors (HPB) and well-being. Research on how living in a context of high political uncertainty can impact nursing students' HPB is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between HPB and self-efficacy among nursing students in a context of high political uncertainty.

Methods

This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study that included 120 undergraduate nursing students from Lebanon who completed an electronic self-reported questionnaire.

Results

The results indicated that HPB measured by HPLP-II scores were negatively correlated with overall uncertainty scores (r = −.29, p < .01) and positively correlated with the General Self-Efficacy (GSE) scale scores (r = .41, p < .001). Results from the multiple linear regression model indicated that physical activity frequency and GSE were independent predictors of the total health-promoting lifestyle profile and the model explained 30.28% of the variance in the total HPLP-II scale.

Linking Evidence to Action

This study further emphasizes the importance of regular physical activity (at least 3 h a week) as a strategy to improve HPB among nursing students. Culturally sensitive strategies that aim to enhance HPB should be embedded in undergraduate nursing curricula. Public health nurses and university counselors should join efforts to develop strategies to maintain or enhance self-efficacy and to promote regular physical activity among nursing students. Future research should further study the association between self-efficacy, resilience, and uncertainty in contexts of ongoing conflicts.

Nursing surveillance of respiratory adverse events among hospitalized adults: A systematic review to guide evidence‐based practice

Abstract

Background

Nursing surveillance (NS) involves the purposeful, ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of patient data for clinical decision-making. Surveillance is used to identify patients with early signs of distress and prevent adverse events. The processes that support and measure the outcomes of nursing surveillance are not clearly specified.

Aim

The aim of this systematic review was to describe the impact of NS on respiratory adverse events for adult hospitalized patients.

Methods

The PRISMA model guided this systematic search of Academic Search Complete (EBSCOhost), CINAHL Complete (EBSCOhost), Nursing & Allied Health (ProQuest), and PubMed databases for articles published between 1990 and 2019. Search terms included nursing surveillance, data points typically attributed to nursing surveillance, adult hospitalized patients, and adverse respiratory events. The protocol for this review was registered as PROSPERO: CRD42020147557.

Results

Of the 2907 references screened, 67 full-text articles were reviewed and 10 were eligible for inclusion. Research on nursing surveillance in the presence of respiratory deterioration is limited. Six studies used assessment tools that were generated from early warning scores, and four used research or institutionally designed trigger criteria. Surveillance, like other types of nursing care, was difficult to isolate and measure. Although components of surveillance were described in the selected studies, the nurse's role was not explicitly identified. Further research is required to highlight the role nursing surveillance plays in clinical decision-making to keep patients safe.

Linking Evidence to Action

The attributes of NS provide a useful intervention guide for the hospitalized patient at risk of deterioration. Early warning score techniques provide empirical evidence for identifying patients at risk of deterioration. The findings of this study provide evidence of the significance for research focused on the attributes of NS relative to responding to patients at risk of deterioration.

Information and communication technology for physical activity in persons living with dementia: A systematic review with implications for evidence‐based practice

Abstract

Background

Persons living with dementia often encounter many difficulties in their community due to functional limitations. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) could be useful to monitor changes in their physical function. However, there is a lack of systematic reviews about using ICT for physical activity.

Aim

This review aimed to synthesize the literature regarding the use of ICT to monitor the physical activity of persons living with dementia.

Methods

A systematic search was conducted in five electronic databases using search terms derived from the Patient, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome (PICO) framework. We included articles published in English from 2011 to 2021. Quality of the included studies was evaluated by two independent authors using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT).

Results

Thirty-three quantitative studies were included for review. Included studies showed fairly good quality in the MMAT evaluation. Wearable devices were mainly employed (88%). The ICTs were used to objectively measure physical activity, activity status, gait, and circadian rhythm. ICTs have been utilized for four purposes: (1) comparing physical activity within the dementia subgroups or with the normal group, (2) exploring the relationship with other variables, 3) examining the experimental study's outcomes, and (4) checking the sensors' feasibility. The results demonstrated that ICT devices were feasible to use in persons living with dementia in the community, helpful for monitoring the physical activity of persons living with dementia, and useful for improving physical activity when properly incorporated in care planning.

Linking Evidence to Action

ICTs can help gather objective data regarding the type, intensity, and level of physical activity in persons living with dementia without time constraints. Also, ICTs use in persons living with dementia in the community was acceptable. We suggest future studies to activate and use ICTs in dementia research.

Systematic review of patient education for pressure injury: Evidence to guide practice

Abstract

Background

Pressure injuries (PIs) are generally regarded as predictable and preventable. Therefore, providing appropriate care for PI prevention and its management is vital. Patient education is a significant component of the PI international guideline-recommended strategy in preventing PIs. Despite the availability of evidence supporting patient education, consensus regarding the effect of patient education on knowledge, patient participation, wound healing progress, and quality of life is still lacking.

Aims

The main aim was to systematically evaluate the available evidence regarding the effectiveness of structured patient education on their knowledge, participation, wound healing, and quality of life.

Methods

The search strategy retrieved studies published between 2009 and 2021 in English across PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, ProQuest, and Cochrane Library. Adult participants aged 18 years and above were included. Randomized controlled trials, quasi-experimental, and interventional studies were all included in this review. Three independent reviewers assessed the methodological quality of the studies, prior to critical appraisal, using standardized tools, that is, the Joanna Briggs Institute checklist for randomized and non-randomized studies. A narrative synthesis was conducted.

Results

A total of eight studies (466 participants) were included in this review. Available evidence indicated improved patient knowledge, participation, and quality of life with structured patient education. However, there was insufficient high-quality evidence to conclude the effect on wound healing.

Linking Evidence to Action

Structured patient education for PI was deemed to help improve patients' knowledge, participation, and quality of life. More rigorous trials are needed for the effect on wound healing progress. Thus, future educational interventions should include wound care components that describe the patient's role in promoting wound healing. A well-structured patient education program protocol is crucial to ensure the educational intervention was measurable in its effectiveness and reproducibility.

Home‐based exercise programs in patients with chronic kidney disease: A systematic review and META‐analysis

Abstract

Background

Intradialysis exercise programs in renal patients result in improved functional capacity, muscle strength, symptoms of depression, and health-related quality of life. Home-based exercise programs are an alternative to overcome logistical and human resource problems. However, the implementation of these programs is not an easy task and there is a lack of knowledge regarding the benefits associated with home-based exercise programs.

Aim

To determine whether home-based exercise programs improve functional capacity, health-related quality of life, muscle strength, and symptoms of depression among patients with stage III–V chronic kidney disease.

Methods

A systematic review and meta-analyses following PRISMA guidelines were utilized. Relevant articles were collected and independently assessed for their inclusion eligibility. Effects of home-based exercise were summarized by the standardized mean differences and represented by forest plots (Review Manager 5.4).

Results

Eight studies were included, none of which reported any adverse effects. The intervention was usually aerobic, 76% of these programs lasted 3–6 months, and exercise adherence was 60–87.5%. Four studies measured health-related quality of life and found significant improvements in several subscales. Regarding functional capacity, five studies used the six-minute walking test (44.9 meters; 95% CI [30.45, 59.30]; p ≤ .001), three studies used the sit-to-stand-to-sit test (−0.45 seconds; 95% CI [−0.46, −0.26]; p ≤ .001), and two studies used the timed up-and-go test (−0.76 seconds; 95% CI [−1.38, −0.15]; p ≤ .001) and the handgrip strength test (1.16 kg; 95% CI [−2.88, 5.20]; p ≤ .001).

LINKING EVIDENCE TO ACTION

Home-based exercise programs are beneficial to renal patients. These interventions are safe and effective to improve health-related quality of life and functional capacity and reduce symptoms of depression among patients with chronic kidney disease.

Patient preferences and experiences of participation in surgical cancer care

Abstract

Background

Quality cancer care necessitates opportunities for patient participation, supposedly recognizing the individual's preferences and experiences for being involved in their health and healthcare issues. Previous research shows that surgical cancer patients wish to be more involved, requiring professionals to be sensitive of patients' needs.

Aims

To explore preference-based patient participation in surgical cancer care.

Methods

A cross-sectional study was conducted. The Patient Preferences for Patient Participation tool (4Ps) was used, which includes 12 attributes of preferences for and experiences of patient participation. Data were analyzed with descriptive and comparative statistical methods.

Results

The results are based on a total of 101 questionnaires. Having reciprocal communication and being listened to by healthcare staff were commonly deemed crucial for patient participation. While 60% of the patients suggested that taking part in planning was crucial for their participation, they had experienced this only to some extent. Learning to manage symptoms and phrasing personal goals were items most often representing insufficient conditions for preference-based patient participation.

Linking Evidence to Action

To support person-centered surgical care, further efforts to suffice preference-based participation are needed, including opportunities for patients to share their experiences and engage in the planning of healthcare activities.

Meta‐synthesis of family communication patterns during post‐stroke vascular aphasia: Evidence to guide practice

Abstract

Background

Previous studies have predominantly focused on the needs of persons with aphasia (PWA), after a stroke diagnosis. However, aphasia is found to cause communication challenges in persons with stroke and their family caregivers as a unit. Evidence is inconclusive about the communication patterns of both persons with aphasia and their family caregivers after a stroke. Studies have not been synthesized on facilitators and barriers of communication patterns between PWA and family caregivers after a stroke.

Aims

A meta-synthesis of qualitative evidence was conducted to explore family communication patterns after post-stroke vascular aphasia.

Methods

An electronic literature search of PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, PsyINFO, and Scopus was performed from January to March 2021. The methods of qualitative meta-synthesis were underpinned by Sandelowski and Barosso's guidelines. Data analysis was facilitated by Braun and Clarke thematic analysis, using NVivo 11 software.

Results

A total of twenty studies were included for meta-synthesis. Three themes with corresponding subthemes were identified: (1) changes in family communication patterns (subthemes: adapting to the changes in PWA after a stroke, striving toward communication recovery); (2) facilitators of family communication patterns (subthemes: supportive communication techniques, hope of recovery, time to re-adjust, and community engagement [recreational activities]); and (3) barriers of communication (subthemes: emotional turmoil and daunting tasks of rehabilitation).

Linking Evidence to Action

Although persons with aphasia and family caregivers are striving to achieve normalcy in communication, they are often challenged by communication deficits and protective family behaviors. Therefore, to establish effective communication, it is of paramount importance for nursing professionals to educate PWAs and their caregivers on facilitators and barriers of family communication patterns. Technology-based family communication facilitation and support groups for PWA and their family caregivers are recommended to promote family communication. The review was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42021235519).

Evaluation of a pre‐exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) program for HIV prevention in a federally qualified health center (FQHC)

Abstract

Background

Preventing new cases of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is key to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America initiative. In 2012, Truvada became the first medication approved in the United States to prevent HIV infection, yet it has not seen widespread use.

Aim

This study aimed to allow for the incorporation of an HIV risk assessment into the primary care provider (PCP) visit and promote increased numbers of patients screened for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV (PrEP).

Methods

An educational program and an electronic HIV risk assessment tool were provided to the healthcare providers in an urban federally qualified health center to decrease barriers to providing PrEP.

Results

Provider likelihood to prescribe PrEP increased among the internal medicine/family medicine (p = .0001, p = .0001) and obstetrics/gynecology providers (p = .0034, p = .0034), but there was no significant change among the pediatric providers (p = .4227, p = .1965).

Linking Evidence to Action

Improvement among most providers demonstrated the success of this effort. Additional assessments and interventions are warranted among pediatric providers. Continued efforts are needed to progress to the incorporation of PrEP in the PCP visit.

The effectiveness of telemedicine interventions on women with postpartum depression: A systematic review and meta‐analysis

Abstract

Background

Postpartum depression (PPD) is a public health problem that has significant adverse effects on mothers, couple's relationships, newborn neurodevelopment, and child emotional and cognitive development. This study reviewed the effectiveness of telemedicine interventions in postparturient women with postpartum depression.

Aims

To evaluate the effectiveness of telemedicine intervention in women with postpartum depression.

Methods

Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were searched for relevant articles published between 2003 and March 2021. We also manually reviewed the reference lists of the retrieved articles. The present study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The risk of bias for individual studies was evaluated according to the Cochrane Handbook. RevMan 5.4 software was used to carry out the meta-analysis.

Results

The meta-analysis included 20 randomized controlled trials with a total of 3252 patients. The results demonstrated that telemedicine was an effective intervention for treating PPD and anxiety and for improving functional impairment in women during their postpartum period.

Linking Evidence to Action

This meta-analysis provided evidence that telemedicine was an effective intervention for treating PPD in women. Telemedicine also has significant effects on anxiety and improved functional impairment in women during their postpartum period. Our findings may provide accurate evidence-based guidance for postpartum women's mental health management. In the future, more high-quality studies are required for verifying these results.

Associations among professional quality of life dimensions, burnout, nursing practice environment, and turnover intention in newly graduated nurses

Abstract

Background

Professional quality of life affects nurses’ well-being and the quality of care. However, little attention is paid to the relationships among professional quality of life dimensions, burnout, nursing practice environment, and intention to leave this job in newly graduated nurses.

Aims

To assess the levels of professional quality of life dimensions and turnover intention, to examine the predictors for turnover intention, and to explore the mediating roles of professional quality of life dimensions on the associations between these predictors and turnover intention in Chinese newly graduated nurses.

Methods

This was a cross-sectional study with 315 newly graduated nurses selected from five tertiary hospitals and five secondary hospitals in Sichuan province, China. Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the effects of demographic characteristics and work-related factors on intention to leave this job. Structural equation modeling technique was performed to explore the mediating effect of each domain of professional quality of life on the relationships between the predictors and turnover intention.

Results

The prevalence of average levels of burnout, secondary traumatic stress, and compassion satisfaction was 43.2%, 57.1%, and 81.3%, respectively. Moreover, 43.8% and 0.6% of the participants reported high and exceptionally high intention to leave this job. Nursing practice environment, social support, and empathy indirectly and significantly affected turnover intention via the mediating roles of burnout and compassion satisfaction, respectively. However, no significant mediating effect of secondary traumatic stress was found between these predictors and turnover intention.

Linking Evidence to Action

Perceptions of greater nursing practice environment, social support, and empathy result in lower turnover intention via reducing burnout and facilitating compassion satisfaction. Strategies such as developing a supportive work and family environment, and cultivating empathic capacity can be effective methods to mitigate against intention to leave this job in newly graduated nurses.

Fall prevention in hospitals and nursing homes: Clinical practice guideline

Abstract

Background

Falls and their consequences are particularly common in older adults in hospitals and long-term care (LTC) facilities.

Aim

To avoid falls and their consequences, and provide nurses with an overview of all relevant research literature on fall prevention, and a practice guideline on fall prevention in older adults was developed.

Methods

The development process included a systematic literature review to identify systematic reviews and primary studies on the topic of fall prevention, an assessment of the study quality, the preparation of meta-analyses to summarize the results, and the application of the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach to grade the scientific literature. The guideline panel and an external multidisciplinary team graded the recommendations using the Delphi method. In addition, the panel and team formulated expert opinions.

Results

A total of 79 randomized controlled trials on fall prevention were identified, which formed the basis of the recommendations. Strongly recommended measures for both settings included multifactorial interventions, professionally supported body exercise interventions, and education and counselling interventions. The panel and team did not recommend the use of a specific assessment tool for fall risk assessment, low-floor beds in hospitals, or body exercise interventions in frail residents.

Linking Evidence to Action

During the development of this guideline, particular attention was paid to collecting evidence-based knowledge relevant to practice. By applying the recommendations, the outlined nursing care is justified, enabling healthcare personnel to achieve the overriding goal of providing optimal care to persons at risk of falling. Evidence for several fall prevention interventions was graded as very low. Sound intervention studies are necessary to strengthen the confidence in the evidence for low-floor beds, alarm sensor systems, medication review, and staff education in hospitals.

Occurrence rate and risk factors for long‐term central line‐associated bloodstream infections in patients with cancer: A systematic review

Abstract

Introduction

Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) is a public health problem that harms patients' outcomes and healthcare costs, especially in susceptible populations such as patients with cancer. Overall, systematic queries about etiology, risks, and epidemiology are explained by data from observational studies, which better underline the relationship between factors and incidence of disease. However, no recent systematic reviews of observational studies on adult patients with cancer have been conducted on this topic, considering the wide range of all potential factors which can contribute to the increase in infection rate in the hospitalized adults with cancer. This study systematically reviewed observational studies investigating the occurrence rate of CLABSI and its risk factors for long-term inserted central catheter-related infections in hospitalized adult cancer patients.

Methods

A systematic review was performed on four databases from the earliest available date until December 2020. Retrospective and prospective cohort studies focused on the occurrence rate of CLABSI and its risk factors in hospitalized adult cancer patients. The pooled occurrence rate of CLABSI (95% CI) was calculated by applying a random-effects model.

Results

Of 1712 studies, 8 were eligible, and the data of device-related infection rate were meta-analyzed. The pooled occurrence rate of CLABSI was roughly 8% (95% CI [4%, 14%]). The device characteristics, device's management aspects, therapies administration, and select patients' clinical conditions represent the main risk factors for long-term catheter-related infection in cancer patients.

Linking Evidence to Action

Considering the substantial infection rate among cancer patients, identifying risk rate factors is pivotal to support evidence-grounded preventive strategies and maximize cancer patient safety. This study's results could guide policymakers and healthcare leaders and future research studies to disseminate appropriate risk-reducing management culture and implement standardized research and clinical approach to the investigated phenomenon as an infection surveillance strategy.

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