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AnteayerWorldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing

Designing, planning, and conducting systematic reviews and other knowledge syntheses: Six key practical recommendations to improve feasibility and efficiency

Abstract

Background

Knowledge syntheses, such as systematic reviews, scoping reviews, and realist reviews, are crucial tools to guide nursing practice, policy, and research. However, conducting high-quality knowledge syntheses is a complex and time-consuming endeavor. It is imperative for nursing students, clinicians, and researchers to be aware of key practical recommendations regarding the conduct of knowledge syntheses to improve the feasibility and efficiency of such projects.

Aim

The aim of this paper was to discuss key practical recommendations for designing, planning, and conducting knowledge syntheses relevant to nursing policy, practice, and research.

Methods

The recommendations discussed are based on best-practice guidance about knowledge synthesis methodology proposed by The Campbell Collaboration (Campbell systematic reviews: Policies and guidelines, 2020), Cochrane (Cochrane training, 2019), and the Joanna Briggs Institute (The Joanna Briggs Institute reviewers' manual, 2020) and on strategies used by the authors to improve the feasibility and efficiency of knowledge syntheses.

Results

This paper highlights six key practical recommendations that nursing students, clinicians, and researchers should take into account when deciding to embark on a knowledge synthesis project: (1) determining if (and why) knowledge synthesis should be conducted; (2) selecting the appropriate type of knowledge synthesis, as well as the associated methodological guidance and reporting standards; (3) developing a search strategy that balances sensitivity and specificity; (4) writing a protocol and obtaining feedback; (5) determining the resources required to conduct the different stages of the knowledge synthesis; and (6) keeping an audit trail. Fifteen common types of knowledge synthesis are presented with their definitions, relevant methodological guidance, and reporting standards.

Linking evidence to action

The recommendations discussed, used in conjunction with appropriate methodological guidelines, may help ensure the success of a knowledge synthesis project by providing best-practice and experience-based guidance to newcomers in the field.

The Doctor of Nursing Practice help desk: An innovative approach to developing evidence‐based practice competency and providing DNP project support

Abstract

Background

The 2021 American Association for Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Essentials for Professional Nursing Education identifies evidence-based practice (EBP) as a core concept meant to be integrated across curricula. Integrating EBP in Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs is challenging because of barriers including persistent confusion between research, EBP, and quality improvement; low faculty confidence and competence in their EBP skills and mentoring; increased faculty workload with growing program enrollments; and limited opportunities for students and faculty to practice EBP skills.

Aims

The aim of this initiative was to implement and evaluate an innovative education strategy to build DNP students' and faculty's EBP competency and confidence while mitigating barriers faced by DNP programs.

Methods

A DNP Help Desk was created and implemented at a large, Midwestern college of nursing with participation and support from EBP experts. Student and faculty participation were tracked, and perceptions of the help desk were evaluated. Opportunities to evolve the help desk were identified and implemented.

Results

Outcomes included a self-reported increase in student and faculty confidence and EBP competency, increased integration, and utilization of EBP in project work, elevated DNP project quality, and decreased demands on DNP project advisors.

Linking Evidence to Action

Engaging in innovative strategies aimed at increasing EBP competency and confidence may lead to increased EBP engagement and positive outcomes for students, faculty, and DNP programs.

Issue Information

Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, Volume 19, Issue 5, Page 341-343, October 2022.

The facilitated sensemaking model as a framework for nursing intervention on family members of mechanically ventilated patients in the intensive care unit

Abstract

Background

Adverse psychological outcomes are prevalent among family members of intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The facilitated sensemaking model (FSM) provides a framework for understanding how intensive care nurses can help these family members overcome situations in which a loved one is critically ill, and reduce adverse psychological outcomes through the facilitated sensemaking process.

Aims

This study aimed to implement FSM-based research performed by ICU nurses and patients' family members to investigate the impact of the facilitated sensemaking intervention on the psychological status of ICU families.

Methods

The intervention was performed by nurses on 80 family members of mechanically ventilated patients, 40 in the control group and 40 in the experimental group. The control group only received routine medical services, while the experimental group received the nursing intervention based on FSM in addition to routine medical services. Anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were measured with the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale, Self-Rating Depression Scale, and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Check-List-Civilian Version (PCL-C), respectively. SPSS version 25.0 was applied to analyze the data; what is more, some statistical methods, including descriptive statistical analysis, chi-square test and t-test were further adopted.

Results

Before the intervention, there were no significant differences in anxiety, depression, and PTSD of family members of ICU mechanical ventilation patients between the two groups (p > .05). After the intervention, the score of anxiety, depression, and PTSD of family members in the control group and the experimental group were 41.50 ± 5.738 versus 36.50 ± 4.385, p < .001; 45.28 ± 8.089 versus 42.13 ± 5.725, p < .05; and 30.55 ± 7.595 versus 27.55 ± 4.696, p < .05, respectively. The nursing intervention based on FSM significantly alleviated anxiety, depression, and PTSD of mechanical ventilation patients' family members.

Linking evidence to action

The nursing intervention based on FSM significantly alleviated anxiety, depression, and PTSD of mechanical ventilation patients' family members. However, there was only a statistically significant difference in the avoidance and numbness symptom cluster of PTSD via the PCL-C. Therefore, the observation time after the implementation of the FSM intervention needs to be extended in the future to clarify the effect of the intervention. Further efforts by advanced practice nurses and the cooperation of patients' families are required to incorporate this intervention into ICU practice.

Effectiveness of a 12‐week tele‐exercise training program on cardiorespiratory fitness and heart rate recovery in patients with cardiometabolic multimorbidity

Abstract

Background

Exercise has positive impacts on cardiometabolic health. However, evidence regarding the effectiveness of tele-exercise training on cardiorespiratory fitness and heart rate recovery in patients with cardiometabolic multimorbidity remains limited.

Aims

The aim of this study was to assess whether an assumed increase in physical activity (PA) after a 12-week tele-exercise training program improved cardiorespiratory fitness and heart rate recovery of patients with cardiometabolic multimorbidity.

Methods

A parallel-group randomized controlled trial was conducted. Eligible patients with cardiometabolic multimorbidity (n = 83) were randomized 1:1 to either an experimental group (EG, received a 12-week tele-exercise training program with 3 sessions/week and 30 min/session and weekly remote monitoring for maintenance of exercise) or a control group (CG, usual care only). PA, cardiorespiratory fitness, and heart rate recovery were assessed at baseline and 12 weeks. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the intervention effects via the interaction of time and group.

Results

Sixty-eight participants (81.9%) completed the study, and 83 were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. The EG with higher vigorous-intensity PA (β = 714, p = .037), walking behavior (β = 750, p = .0007), and total amount of PA (β = 1748, p = .001) after the intervention had significantly elevated cardiorespiratory fitness, including VO2peak (β = 3.9, p = .042), workload (β = 17.9, p = .034), and anaerobic threshold (β = 2.1, p = .041), and increased one-min heart rate recovery (β = 5.3, p = .025), compared with the CG.

Linking evidence to action

A 12-week tele-exercise training program was effective for increased PA, elevated cardiorespiratory fitness, and improved heart rate recovery for patients with cardiometabolic multimorbidity. These findings highlight the feasibility of better delivering lifestyle interventions for cardiometabolic health management.

Evidence, expertise, and patient/family preferences to maximize health for older adults with implications for evidence‐based practice

Abstract

Background

As Americans live longer and with chronic conditions, the healthcare system, researchers, faculty, practicing providers, patients, and families must adapt to changing societal needs and goals.

Aims

The aim of this commentary was to offer recommendations that align with the six vital directions to improve the health care and quality of life for older Americans.

Methods

This article expands upon the six vital directions from an evidence-based practice (EBP) perspective that values the three legs of the EBP stool: (1) research evidence, (2) clinician expertise, and (3) patient preferences, values, and circumstances.

Results

The recommendations reflect the scientific literature, our expertise in EBP and research, our nursing roles and expertise, and our experiences in the care of our older parents. By sharing our experiences as nurse scientists and daughters, we offer insight to raise the healthcare bar for older adults through EBP and meaningful, person-centered care.

Linking Action to Evidence

Vital directions for improving the health care and quality of life for older Americans include promoting interprofessional education to create an adequately prepared workforce; researching and implementing pathways to minimize the social determinants of health for older adults; disseminating findings that remediate older adult health disparities; innovating approaches for managing chronic health conditions at home; and studying and implementing approaches for allocating resources for end-of-life care that are satisfying for the patients, their family, and clinicians.

Issue Information

Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, Volume 19, Issue 4, Page 255-257, August 2022.

Clinical indicators of the nursing diagnosis ineffective health management: Systematic review and meta‐analysis

Abstract

Background

Nursing diagnoses should reasonably represent global nursing practice phenomena, organizing indicators in their clinical structure that represent different scenarios and populations. However, few studies have summarized the evidence of these indicators, mainly for behavioral diagnoses.

Aim

This systematic review aimed to identify the best clinical indicators (CI) to determine the presence or absence of the nursing diagnosis “Ineffective Health Management” (IHM).

Method

A systematic review with meta-analysis was utilized. Six electronic databases were consulted to retrieve studies that identified the nursing diagnosis IHM, with at least one CI. The period of data collection was between September and October 2020. The research group independently conducted the selection, quality assessment, data extraction, and analysis of all included studies. Fixed-effect measures and meta-analyses summarized sensitivity, specificity measures, and diagnostic odds ratios using the statistical software R. The preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses and standards for reporting studies of diagnostic accuracy guidelines were used to guide this review, and quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies was used for the critical appraisal of the methodological quality of the included studies.

Results

The systematic review included 11 studies on people with chronic conditions, the elderly, and pregnant women. The analyzed four CI showed diagnostic odds ratios statistically higher than the unit value, highlighting the “Failure to include the treatment regimen in daily living” (DOR = 45.53; CI = 10.1, 205.6).

Linking Evidence to Action

Overall, findings showed that all CI of the IHM nursing diagnosis had good sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic odds ratio measures to identify their presence correctly. These findings can contribute to better accuracy in nurses' decision-making process, providing indicators to infer the IHM nursing diagnosis early in different population spectra based on the best measures of diagnostic accuracy.

Psychometric properties of the Organizational Culture and Readiness Scale for System‐Wide Integration of Evidence‐Based Practice

Abstract

Background

Patient safety metrics declined due to COVID-19-related strains placed on hospitals and hospital systems. Because evidence-based practice (EBP) can improve patient outcomes and quality of care and empower clinicians, a renewed focus on organizational EBP culture is needed. The Advancing Research and Clinical practice through close Collaboration (ARCC©) Model describes how to use a system-wide approach to advance and sustain EBP in hospital systems to improve outcomes. EBP culture is a key variable that directly impacts EBP knowledge, beliefs, competency, and implementation. The ARCC© Model uses the Organizational Culture and Readiness Scale for System-Wide Integration of Evidence-Based Practice (OCRSIEP) to identify organizational characteristics that influence clinician and patient outcomes. Although the scale has been reported to have excellent reliability, a comprehensive psychometric analysis has yet to be performed that confirms its construct validity.

Aims

The aim of this study was to describe the OCRSIEP's construct validity and reliability via an in-depth psychometric analysis.

Methods

OCRSIEP assessment data were obtained from a prior national study with 2344 nurses from 19 hospitals and healthcare systems. Descriptive statistics summarized the sample and distributions of the 25 scale items. Construct validity was assessed via exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Cronbach's alpha assessed reliability.

Results

A one-factor model was supported by EFA with item Q17b excluded (i.e., to what extent are decisions generated from upper administration). Model fit indices for CFA indicated a good fit (CFI = 0.978, TLI = 0.973, RMSEA = 0.077, SRMR = 0.027). Cronbach's alpha was 0.96 for all items and 0.97 with item Q17b excluded, both indicating outstanding internal consistency.

Linking Evidence to Action

The OCRSIEP is valid and reliable and can be used to assess EBP culture and readiness in hospitals and healthcare systems at the organizational level.

Trends in mental health indicators among nurses participating in healthy nurse, healthy nation from 2017 to 2021

Abstract

Background

American healthcare workers face unprecedented stress and trauma in the workplace during COVID-19, putting nurses at increased risk for poor mental health. Examining trends of mental health from before and during COVID-19 can illuminate the toll of the pandemic on nurses well-being.

Methods

Nurses enrolled in Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation receive a prompt to take an annual survey (n = 24,289). Mental health was assessed by active diagnoses of anxiety and depressive disorder, and feeling sad, down or depressed for two or more weeks in the past year. Logistic regression models were used to calculate predictive probabilities of health outcomes in year 4 (May 1, 2020 – April 30, 2021) compared to years 1–3 (each from May 1 to April 30), controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and nurse type. Models were also stratified by work setting and nurse type.

Results

In year 4, nurses had a 19.8% probability of anxiety disorder, significantly higher than year 3 (16.3%, p < .001), year 2 (13.7%, p < .001), and year 1 (14.0%, p < .001). Similarly, nurses had a 16.7% probability of depression disorder in year 4, significantly higher than year 2 (12.9%, p < .001) and year 1 (13.9%, p < .01). Year 4 nurses had a 34.4% probability of feeling sad, down or depressed for two weeks, significantly higher than previous years (year 1 = 26.8%, year 2 = 25.9%, year 3 = 29.7%, p < .001). Trends in probabilities of mental health indicators were similar among each nurse type and work setting. Nurses in medical/surgical work settings and those with licensed practical nurse and licensed vocational nurse titles consistently had the highest probability of poor mental health.

Linking Action to Evidence

In 2020–2021, nurses faced challenges unlike any experienced in previous years. Unsurprisingly, nurses reported increased instances of poor mental health indicators. Positive disruptive strategies are needed to systemically change organizational culture and policy to prioritize and support nurses’ well-being.

EBP education and skills building for leaders: An RCT to promote EBP infrastructure, process and implementation in a comprehensive cancer center

Abstract

Background

Implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) in healthcare remains challenging. The influence of leadership has been recognized. However, few randomized trials have tested effects of an educational and skills building intervention for leaders in clinical settings.

Aims

Test effects of an EBP leadership immersion intervention on EBP attributes over time among two cohorts of leaders at a national comprehensive cancer center.

Methods

A stratified, randomized, wait-list group, controlled design was conducted. Participants received the evidence-based intervention one year apart (2020, n = 36; 2021, n = 30) with EBP knowledge, beliefs, competencies, implementation self-efficacy, implementation behaviors, and organizational readiness measured at pre- and post-intervention, and one- and two-year follow-ups. Participants applied learnings to a specific clinical or organization priority topic.

Results

Baseline outcomes variables and demographics did not differ between cohorts except for age and years of experience. Both cohorts demonstrated significant changes in EBP attributes (except organizational readiness) post-intervention. Mixed linear modeling revealed group by time effects at 3-months for all EBP attributes except implementation behaviors and organizational readiness after the first intervention, favoring cohort 2020, with retained effects for EBP beliefs and competencies at one year. Following Cohort 2021 intervention, at 12-weeks post-intervention, implementation behaviors were significantly higher for cohort 2021.

Linking Evidence to Action

An intensive EBP intervention can increase healthcare leaders' EBP knowledge and competencies. Aligning EBP projects with organizational priorities is strategic. Follow-up with participants to retain motivation, knowledge and competencies is essential. Future research must demonstrate effects on clinical outcomes.

Healthcare consumers' and professionals' perceived acceptability of evidence‐based interventions for rural transitional care

Abstract

Background

There is a pressing need for high quality hospital-to-home transitional care in rural communities. Four evidence-based interventions (discharge planning, treatments, warning signs, and physical activity) have the potential to improve rural transitional care. However, there is limited understanding of how the perceptions of healthcare consumers and professionals compare on the acceptability of the interventions. Convergent views on intervention acceptability support implementation, whereas divergent views highlight areas requiring reconciliation prior to implementation.

Aims

This study compared the acceptability of four evidence-based interventions proposed for rural transitional care, as perceived by healthcare consumers and professionals.

Methods

A cross-sectional, comparative design was used. The convenience sample included 36 healthcare consumers (20 patients and 16 family caregivers) who had experienced a hospital-to-home transition in the past month and 30 healthcare professionals (29 registered nurses and one nurse practitioner) who provided transitional care in rural Ontario, Canada. Participants were presented with descriptions of the four interventions and completed an established intervention acceptability measure. Presentation of the four intervention descriptions and respective acceptability measures was randomized to control for possible order effects. The perceived overall acceptability of the interventions and their attributes (i.e., effectiveness, appropriateness, risk, and convenience) were compared using independent samples t-tests.

Results

Consumer ratings were consistently higher across all four interventions in terms of overall acceptability as well as effectiveness, appropriateness, and convenience (all p's < .01; effect sizes 0.70–1.13). No significant between-group differences in perceived risk were found.

Linking evidence to action

Contextual and methodological differences may account for variability in ratings, but further research is needed to explore these propositions. The results support future qualitative inquiry targeting professionals to better understand their perspectives on the effectiveness, appropriateness, and convenience of the four interventions.

A guided search: Formulating a PICOT from assigned areas of inquiry

Abstract

The evidence-based practice (EBP) competencies of cultivating inquiry and formulation of Population, Intervention, Outcome, and Time (PICOT) questions are essential to quality improvement, healthcare outcomes, and the development of Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) scholarly projects. Education and assessment of EBP competencies into the DNP curriculum, particularly formulation of PICOT questions, provide guidance and evaluate mastery of students' individual skills and group work. Utilization of a PICOT template is an approach to aid large cohorts of students in writing healthcare-specific PICOTs to guide them in search of quality evidence. Guided inquiry through collaboration with community partners can aid in identifying community needs. Assigning an area of inquiry allows stakeholders, community partners, and nursing students an opportunity to ask the necessary questions to improve health care, and simultaneously meet the need for evidence-based quality improvement.

The impact of COVID‐19 on nurse leadership characteristics

Abstract

Background

Nurse leaders are vital for improving nursing efficiencies and the quality of care that they provide during a crisis and its aftermath. The value of positive leadership characteristics has never been more critical than during the COVID-19 pandemic. Functioning in a crisis mode required nurse leaders to demonstrate the necessary skills for clear communication and solid leadership. Therefore, nursing leadership, especially in emergencies such as the COVID-19 pandemic, needs to be transformative in the sense that leaders are informational, motivating, and able to advance the organization, notwithstanding a global pandemic. Timely leadership research during and after COVID-19 is crucial for filling the literature gap resulting from the unique changes in the nursing profession in the post-pandemic period.

Objective

This study aimed to investigate leadership characteristics shown by nurse leaders during the COVID-19 pandemic, and investigate nurses' perceptions of nurse leader effectiveness based on leaders' work roles.

Methods

An exploratory, quantitative study was conducted 18 months after the declaration of the COVID-19 pandemic (June–August 2021). The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ 5X) was sent to registered nurses (RNs) in Texas using the State Board's listing of active RNs. In total, 70 practicing RNs participated in the study. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate correlational analysis.

Results

Perceived leadership characteristics remained primarily transformational. Nurse directors and executives reported positive leadership characteristics more frequently than did staff and charge nurses.

Linking Evidence to Action

Specific tactics and strategies must be adopted to support nurses and nursing leadership during ongoing healthcare challenges. Close monitoring of leadership characteristics will enable organizations to support and provide educational opportunities for ongoing organizational success.

Psychometric properties of the evidence‐based practice mentorship scale

Abstract

Background

Evidence-based practice (EBP) improves the quality of care, decreases healthcare costs, and improves job satisfaction. However, nurses and other clinicians, as well as their institutions, struggle to consistently implement EBP. The Advancing Research and Clinical practice through close Collaboration (ARCC©) Model established that a cadre of EBP mentors is key to improving EBP knowledge, beliefs, competency, and implementation in clinicians. Yet, there has not been a valid and reliable measure of EBP mentorship.

Aims

The aim of this study was to determine the psychometric properties of the new 8-item EBP Mentorship Scale. This scale measures the degree to which clinicians perceive that EBP mentorship is available to them.

Methods

The EBP Mentorship Scale data were obtained from a previous national cross-sectional descriptive study with 2344 nurses from 19 hospitals and healthcare systems. Descriptive statistics summarized the sample and distributions of the scale items. Cronbach's alpha, exploratory factor analysis (EFA), and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were conducted.

Results

Cronbach's alpha of the scale was 0.99. A one-factor model was supported by EFA and retained for CFA. Model fit indices for CFA indicated a good fit.

Linking evidence to action

The new EBP Mentorship Scale is valid and reliable and can be used to assess the level of EBP mentorship support available in hospitals and healthcare systems. EBP mentors are key in sustaining an EBP organizational culture and enhancing clinician EBP knowledge, beliefs, competency, and implementation.

The effectiveness of ERAS guidelines in reducing postoperative pain

Abstract

Background

Poorly controlled acute postsurgical pain can promote chronic opioid use and misuse long after the initial surgical procedure. Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) guidelines have shown promise in reducing opioid exposure and minimizing opioid-related side effects.

Aims

The aims of this evidence-based practice (EBP) project were to assess the ERAS literature to guide postoperative pain management practice change at an adult colorectal surgical unit, evaluate the practice change outcomes, and disseminate the findings.

Methods

A Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome, and Time (PICOT) question was established to guide an ERAS literature search. Found articles were critically appraised using the FULD Critical Appraisal Tool. Following the critical appraisal, the steps of EBP were utilized to implement an ERAS guideline for adult colorectal surgical patients in a 281-bed medical center. Outcomes of the practice change were evaluated by comparing multimodal analgesic, regional anesthesia, and opioid pain medication use before and after guideline implementation.

Results

Five articles were critically appraised for guideline development. After implementation, data demonstrated an increase in the use of multimodal analgesics and regional anesthesia and a decrease in the use of opioid pain medication. These findings were disseminated through multiple venues within the hospital, including a presentation to the stakeholders.

Linking Evidence to Action

Evidence-based strategies to reduce postoperative pain are achievable while reducing perioperative opioid consumption. Engagement of key stakeholders and timely rollout of EBP changes are important for successful implementation. ERAS guidelines with a multimodal analgesia pathway are an effective way to reduce postoperative pain and perioperative opioid consumption.

A qualitative descriptive study of the role of nurse, allied health and physician middle managers who function as knowledge brokers in hospitals

Abstract

Background

Knowledge brokers (KB) are increasingly being employed in health care to implement evidence-based practice and improve quality of care. Middle managers (MMs) may play a KB role in the implementation of an innovative or evidence-based practice in hospitals. However, how MMs' broker knowledge in hospitals and their impact on practice has not been adequately studied.

Aim

To describe the role that MMs play in brokering knowledge in hospitals and their impact.

Method

A qualitative descriptive study was conducted to generate a detailed description of MM experiences as KBs in hospitals. Data were collected using semi-structured telephone interviews with MMs in Ontario, Canada. Participants were purposively sampled to ensure variation in MM characteristics and a diverse representation of perspectives. Data were collected and analyzed concurrently using an inductive constant comparative approach.

Results

Twenty-one MMs from teaching and non-teaching hospitals participated. MMs described 10 roles and activities they enacted in hospitals that aligned with published KB roles. We found differences across professional groups and hospital type. Teaching status emerged as a potential factor relating to how MM KBs were able to function within hospitals. MMs reported enhanced patient, provider, and organizational outcomes.

Linking Evidence to Action

Middle managers may play an important KB role in the implementation of evidence-based practice in hospitals. An improved understanding of the KB roles that MMs play may be important in boosting evidence base practice in health care to ultimately improve quality of care. Administrators need a better understanding of the current KB roles and activities MMs enact as this may lead to more organizational structures to support MM KBs in health care.

Factors affecting quality of life in low‐income overweight and obese women: The mediating effects of health‐promoting behaviors

Abstract

Background

It is necessary to comprehensively consider the personal and environmental factors of women who experience overweight or obesity and low-income households (WOOL) to improve their quality of life (QoL).

Aims

The aim of this study was to test a hypothetical path model to estimate the effects of self-efficacy, psychological distress, social support, and health-promoting behaviors (HPB) on QoL and verify the mediating effects of HPB among WOOL.

Methods

A total of 151 women with a monthly household income less than 50% of the national median income at eight welfare centers in South Korea participated in this study. Data were collected from January to December 2019 and analyzed using SPSS 25.0 and Amos 23.0.

Results

The fit indices of the model were adequate (χ 2 = 0.197, p = .657; normed χ 2 = 0.197, GFI = 0.999, CFI = 1.000, NFI = 0.999, TLI = 1.000, RMSEA = 0.000, and SRMR = 0.005). Self-efficacy had significant indirect and total effects on QoL (β = 0.064, p = .004, 95% CI [0.015, 0.139]; β = 0.064, p = .004, 95% CI [0.015, 0.139]). HPB completely mediated the path of self-efficacy to QoL. Social support had significant total, direct, indirect, and total effects on QoL (β = 0.326, p = .001, 95% CI [0.010, 0.025]; β = 0.047, p = .015, 95% CI [0.008, 0.120]; β = 0.373, p = .001, 95% CI [0.015, 0.369]). HPB partially mediated the path of social support to QoL. Psychological distress had significant direct effects on QoL (β = −0.307, p = .001, 95% CI [−0.022, −0.007]). Self-efficacy, psychological distress, social support, and HPB explained 42.3% of the total variance in QoL.

Linking Evidence to Action

Integrated nursing interventions that consider self-efficacy, psychological distress, social stress, and HPB can be useful for improving the QoL of WOOL.

Issue Information

Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, Volume 19, Issue 3, Page 169-171, June 2022.
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