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AnteayerInternacionales

Diagnosis and treatment of infected wounds: A multi‐centre audit of current clinical practice across the UK, Ireland and Scandinavia

Abstract

Aims and objectives

Surveillance of wound infection including signs of infection alongside antimicrobial usage (types, duration, frequency) can highlight knowledge gaps and inconsistencies. This manuscript aims to highlight these, identify and inform opportunities for practice improvement and to show impact of infection management practice may be having on the issue of antimicrobial resistance.

Background

Infected wounds pose challenges to healthcare professionals. Balancing risk of wound deterioration and progression to systemic infection with appropriate use of antimicrobials is necessary to minimise development of resistance.

Methods

Analysis consisted of a practice survey of 9661 wounds across 70 community sites over a period of one week. Data were collected from projects between 2017 and 2020. The form was available to providers within the UK, Ireland, Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Finland. EQUATOR research guidelines were followed; STROBE checklist for observational research reporting was completed.

Results

Infection rates of 8.9% were reported from wounds assessed. These data indicate inconsistencies with diagnosis across practice with non-specialists more likely to be unsure of wound infection. Greater confidence in infection identification was observed as number of signs increased. Inconsistencies were also observed in appropriate treatment; antimicrobials were used in 35% of wounds considered not infected and not used in 41% of wounds that were identified as infected.

Conclusions

This investigation of infection management practice of over 9000 wounds provides an insight into diagnosis and treatment of infection. Inconsistencies in diagnosis and treatment of wound infections reported highlight the need for increased education, awareness of diagnosis and treatment of infection.

Relevance to clinical practice

Variability in management of infected wounds highlights opportunities to aid more effective diagnosis and treatment of infected wounds. Incorporation of support tools or evidence-based pathways into practice may enhance confidence in management of local infection, balanced with appropriate use, potentially minimising resistance and improving outcomes.

How registered nurses are measuring respiratory rates in adult acute care health settings: An integrative review

Abstract

Aims and objectives

This integrative review aimed to draw conclusions from evidence on how registered nurses are measuring respiratory rates for acute care patients.

Background

Despite the growing research supporting respiratory rate as an early indicator for clinical deterioration, respiratory rate has consistently been the least frequently measured and accurately documented vital sign.

Design

An integrative review.

Methods

A systematic literature search was conducted in June 2022 in four databases: CINAHL, PubMed, Medline and Scopus. Quality appraisal was undertaken using the Joanna Briggs Institute's Checklist. PRISMA guidelines were followed to ensure explicit reporting and reported in the PRISMA checklist.

Results

Overall, 9915 records were identified, and 19 met the inclusion criteria. Of these 19 articles, seven themes emerged: estimation and digit preference, lack of understanding and knowledge, not valuing the clinical significance of respiratory rate, oxygen saturation substitute, interobserver agreement, subjective concern and count duration. A high prevalence of bias, estimation and incorrect technique was evident. A total of 15 articles reported specifically on how registered nurses are measuring respiratory rates on general medical and surgical wards.

Conclusions

Despite its importance, this integrative review has determined that respiratory rates are not being assessed correctly by nursing staff in the acute care environment. Evidence of using estimation, value bias or quick count and multiply techniques are emerging themes which urgently require further research.

No patient or public contribution.

Systematic review, meta‐analysis and meta‐regression to determine the effects of patient education on health behaviour change in adults diagnosed with coronary heart disease

Abstract

Aims and Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of educational interventions and the relative effect of intervention duration on secondary prevention health behaviours in adults with coronary heart disease.

Background

Patient education can reduce disease progression and improve outcomes. However, there is a lack of knowledge of its efficacy and the relative impact of education duration on health behaviour change in this population.

Design

A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Methods

Seven electronic databases and grey literature were searched from Inception to July 2021. The review followed the PRISMA guidelines. This meta-analysis was analysed in Comprehensive Meta-Analysis version 3 software. Outcomes considered were disease knowledge and health behavioural outcomes. Data were pooled together with random-effects models using the inverse-variance method. The effect of education duration (<3 vs. ≥3 months) was examined by meta-regressions.

Results

In summary, 73 studies were included with a total of participants (n = 24,985) aged mean of 60.5 ± 5.7 years and mostly male (72.5%). Patient education improved all behaviours including disease knowledge at <6 and 6–12 months follow-up, the likelihood of quitting smoking at <6, and 6–12 months, medication adherence at <6 and 6–12 months; physical activity and exercise participation at <6 and 6–12 months and healthy dietary behaviours, at <6 and 6–12 months. Furthermore, education programmes with a longer duration (≥3 months) improved disease knowledge and physical activity more than shorter programmes.

Conclusion

Patient education for secondary prevention, in various delivery modes and intensities, improves multiple self-reported health behaviours in patients with coronary heart disease.

Relevance to clinical practice

This study assessed the effectiveness of secondary prevention education and demonstrated improvements in all outcomes in this population. Longer duration programmes were more effective in improving disease knowledge and physical activity in the long term. These findings can assist the cardiac programmes’ design, particularly in ensuring sufficient intervention duration.

Experiences of nurses working in RACFs and EDs utilising visual telehealth consultation to assess the need for RACF resident transfer to ED: A qualitative descriptive study

Abstract

Aims and objectives

This study aimed to explore whether an intervention using visual telehealth improves care outcomes for residents in residential aged care facilities during acute illness events from the perspective of the nurses from residential aged care facilities and emergency departments. The intervention was the addition of visual telehealth, to an already existing outreach service called Aged Care Emergency.

Background

Older people who are residents of residential aged care facilities commonly experience potentially avoidable visits and hospitalisations. Adopting visual telehealth or telemedicine has emerged as a care transition solution across several domains in health care, including residential aged care.

Method

This study used an interpretive descriptive methodological approach and was part of a larger study called the PACE-IT project that implemented a visual telehealth assisted model of care in four emergency departments and 16 residential aged care facilities to prevent unnecessary resident presentations to emergency departments. We report findings from six focus groups that explored key issues relating to the experiences of emergency department and residential aged care nurses who participated in the PACE-IT project. This study adhered to COREQ research guidelines.

Results

There were four overarching themes that emerged from the six focus groups; facilitated person centred care; built confidence, relationships and trust; enabled bidirectional communication that strengthens decision making, but there were issues with technology access, connectivity and usability between the acute care setting and the residential aged care facility.

Relevance to clinical practice

Understanding the experiences of residential aged care facility and emergency nurses' experiences when using visual telehealth will better inform practice development in aged care, in particular enhancing decision making and increasing safe practices using telehealth. The knowledge gained in this study in terms of enhanced assessments for residents will provide policy makers with valuable insights for future health care planning and implementation of telehealth.

Trial registration

ACTRN12619001692123.

Role of interaction for caller satisfaction in telenursing—A cross‐sectional survey study

Abstract

Aims and objectives

The aim of this study was to explore caller satisfaction with interaction, and the association to overall satisfaction with calls.

Background

In the era of expanding healthcare at distance, the telephone remains a common tool for the provision of nursing care. Interaction between telenurse and caller in telenursing is vital for safety, satisfaction and adherence reasons. Few studies have quantitatively explored interaction in calls and how it relates to overall satisfaction with calls.

Design

Cross-sectional survey study with a deductive approach.

Methods

A total of 466 callers to the Swedish Medical Advisory Service completed the Telenursing Interaction and Satisfaction Questionnaire. Satisfaction with four theoretically defined components of interaction were compared using repeated measures ANOVA. Associations between satisfaction with interaction and overall satisfaction with calls were evaluated with ordinal logistic regression models with and without adjustment for age, sex, health status, waiting time, time for call, main result of the call and expectations. The study followed the STROBE checklist.

Results

Callers were most satisfied with affective support, followed by professional-technical competence, health information and decisional control—in that order. A summated score of satisfaction with interaction was positively and significantly associated with overall satisfaction with calls before and after adjustment for waiting time, main result of call and variables related to the individual caller.

Conclusions

Caller satisfaction with interaction is generally high but can be improved, especially regarding decisional control. Satisfaction with interaction is important for overall satisfaction with calls.

Relevance to clinical practice

This study provides support for professionals at all levels in telenursing organisations to pay attention to interactional matters. The development of best practice for telenurses needs to consider all four components of interaction to enhance satisfaction with calls.

Mother–child dyad support needs to be expressed by mothers diagnosed with breast cancer

Abstract

Aims and objectives

To investigate the support needs identified by Taiwanese breast cancer diagnosed mothers for themselves and their 6–12-year-old children for implementation in a support group.

Background

Mothers with dependent children are burdened with diverse child-centered concerns while battling breast cancer. A better understanding of the concomitant support needs of mothers and their children can yield tailored support for ill mothers and their children.

Design

A qualitative descriptive study employing content analysis of collected data.

Methods

Between February and June of 2020, semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with 20 mothers who had been diagnosed with breast cancer in the last 2 years. Qualitative content analysis was used. This study followed the COREQ guidelines.

Results

Ill mothers favoured a hybrid format for support groups, consisting of mother-only, child-only, and mother–child group sessions. The content analysis yielded four themes for mother-only group sessions: (1) learning to reach out to children; (2) dealing with negative emotions; (3) how to say goodbye to children; and (4) resetting for the future. Three themes related to child-only group sessions emerged: (1) emotional and health education; (2) getting along with a sick mother; and (3) preparing for uncertainty. The core theme for mother–child group sessions was relationship enhancement.

Conclusion

The findings revealed that mother-reported support needs of ill mothers and their children included support for improving children's emotional well-being and mothers' emotional coping, preparing for uncertainty, and promoting intimacy in the mother–child relationship.

Relevance to clinical practice

A relation-focused approach to psychosocial support group development that allows mother–child mutual influences on each other's coping to be addressed bilaterally is suggested.

Patient or public contribution

Mothers diagnosed with breast cancer were interviewed for data collection and invited to review and validate the synthesised data for enhancing the credibility of the study.

Altered dynamic brain activity and its association with memory decline after night shift‐related sleep deprivation in nurses

Abstract

Aims and objectives

To investigate, for the first time, aberrant time-varying local brain activity in nurses following night shift–related sleep deprivation (SD) and its association with memory decline.

Background

Prior studies have elucidated alterations in static local brain activity resulting from SD in the occupations outside medical profession.

Design

A longitudinal study followed the STROBE recommendations.

Methods

Twenty female nurses underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and memory function assessment (by Complex Figure Test (CFT) and the California Verbal Learning Test, Second Edition (CVLT-II)) twice, once in a rested wakefulness (RW) state and another after SD. By combining the sliding-window approach and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) analysis, the dynamic ALFF (dALFF) variability was calculated to reflect the characteristics of dynamic local brain activity.

Results

Poor performance on the CFT and CVLT-II was observed in nurses with night shift–related SD. Reduced dALFF variability was found in a set of cognition-related brain regions (including the medial/middle/superior frontal gyrus, anterior/posterior cingulate gyrus, precuneus, angular gyrus, orbitofrontal and subgenual areas, and posterior cerebellum lobe), while increased dALFF variability was observed in the somatosensory-related, visual and auditory regions. SD-related dALFF variability alterations correlated with changes in subjects' performance on the CFT and CVLT-II.

Conclusions

Night shift–related SD disturbed dynamic brain activity in high cognitive regions and induced compensatory reactions in primary perceptual cortex. Identifying dALFF variability abnormalities may broaden our understanding of neural substrates underlying SD-related cognitive alterations, especially memory dysfunction.

Relevance to clinical practice

Night shift–related SD is as an important occupational hazard affecting brain function in nurses. The effective countermeasure addressing the adverse outcomes of SD should be advocated for nurses.

Patient or public contribution

Patients or public were not involved in the design and implementation of the study or the analysis and interpretation of the data.

Longitudinal study of the flash glucose monitoring system in type 1 diabetics: An mHealth ally in times of COVID‐19

Abstract

Aims and objectives

The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the FreeStyle Libre device implantation in adult type 1 diabetics in a Health Area of Castilla La Mancha (Spain) during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Background

FreeStyle Libre is a so-called mHealth device that supports health care. During COVID-1 confinement, diabetic patients could have improved their glycaemic monitoring thanks to these devices, although health care in these patients may have been limited due to confinement.

Methods

A 12-month longitudinal study in which a total of 206 type I diabetics participated, belonging to a single health area. Sociodemographic and analytical data and the Self Care Inventory Revised questionnaire (SCI-R) were collected. STROBE checklist was followed.

Results

The analysis showed differences related to the use of the sensor. After the study period, patients obtained better levels of basal glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin, creatinine, cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL. In addition, a significant increase in the total score of the SCI-R questionnaire was observed after the use of the monitor (MD −7.77; 95% CI −10.43, −8.29). The same occurred with different SCI-R items such as diet (MD -2.995; 95% CI −3.24, −2.57), glucose determination (MD −3.21; 95% CI −3.52, −2.91), medication administration (MD −2.58; 95% CI −2.53, −1.96) and hypoglycaemic episodes (MD −1.07; 95% CI −1.21, −0.93). In the analysis by groups, worse values of glycosylated haemoglobin and adherence to treatment (p < .05) were observed in overweight/obese subjects versus those with normal weight after one year of study.

Conclusion

The use of flash monitoring is related to better adherence to most of the recommended habits in diabetes. Nevertheless, there seems to be no relationship with an improvement in physical exercise and preventive aspects of diabetes. A good nursing intervention to support physical exercise and the use of mHealth devices could improve the control of diabetic patients.

Relevance to clinical practice

The use of this mHealth device has shown positive results and reduced complications. Despite less contact with healthcare facilities due to the pandemic, type 1 diabetic patients have improved their blood results and adherence after using the device for one year. Nursing staff should focus on promoting physical activity and routine disease care in type 1 diabetics.

What we need to know about uncertainty in illness among people with primary malignant brain tumours: A mixed‐methods systematic review

Abstract

Aims and objectives

To identify the characteristics of uncertainty in illness (UI) among people with primary malignant brain tumours (PMBT).

Background

High recurrence rates and complex symptoms cause uncertainty in people with PMBT. Given the characteristics of PMBT, reviewing UI among people with PMBT will benefit future research and clinical intervention development.

Design

A mixed-methods systematic review.

Methods

We performed a mixed-methods systematic review (PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO, Scopus and Cochrane Library), including studies on UI among people with PMBT, searched from the databases' inception to the search date. The initial search was conducted in July 2021, with an additional search in March 2022. The major search terms were PMBT and UI, and no limitations were placed on the study design. The Cochrane tool was used to evaluate the risk of bias in randomised controlled trials, and JBI checklists were used to evaluate quasi-experimental studies, survey methodology studies and a case study. This review was reported using the PRISMA 2020 checklist. Both quantitative and qualitative research data were extracted, analysed and then integrated in three stages of a mixed-methods systematic review.

Results

Eleven studies were included. Due to physical, psychological and social risk factors, the UI progression of people with PMBT was complex and ambiguous, although they adapted to the PMBT diagnosis and treatment process. Subsequently, we proposed a model of UI among people with PMBT.

Conclusions

UI has multidimensional characteristics, and healthcare providers need to consider these aspects for people with PMBT.

Relevance to clinical practice

The proposed model provides directions for nursing practice and future research. Nurses caring for people with PMBT should comprehend their UI and intervene accordingly.

Patient or public contribution

This review incorporated data including people with PMBT in hospitals and communities. This analysis contributes to the clinical-to-community nursing transition process for people with PMBT.

Nurses' professional values and competency in Saudi Arabia: A structural equation modelling approach

Abstract

Aims and objectives

To explore the relationship between Saudi nurses' professional values and competence.

Background

Professionals are bound by ethical standards specific to their profession. Accordingly, the COVID-19 pandemic is the most significant event that has impacted nurses' professional values and competency.

Design

A descriptive cross-sectional design adhering to STROBE guidelines.

Methods

Clinical nurses from four tertiary government hospitals (n = 659) participated and completed two self-report instruments. Study variables were analysed using the structural equation modelling approach.

Results

The emerging model displayed acceptable model fit indices. Professionalism and activism were two dimensions of nurse professional values that significantly impacted professional competency. Professionalism significantly impacted the four other aspects of nurse professional values: caring, activism, trust, and justice. Caring had a significant and direct impact on activism. Activism had a weak, direct effect on trust, whereas justice had a moderate, direct effect on trust. Through the mediation of the dimension of activism, both the dimensions of professionalism and caring had a strong, indirect impact on professional competency.

Conclusions

This research presents a structural model of the interrelationship between nurse professional values and competency. Nurse administrators can use the proposed model to develop approaches and policies for assessing, improving and evaluating professional values among nurses.

Relevance for Clinical Practice

Nursing professionals are committed to upholding their ethical and moral standards while performing their caregiver roles. Nurse administrators can implement activities and strategies to develop nurses' professional competence further, as professional values represent the ideal values expected of nurses providing patient care.

Barriers to accessing sterile injecting equipment for people who inject drugs: An integrative review

Abstract

Background

The global prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection is estimated to be 71 million, with an estimated 6.1 million of those having recently injected drugs. The recognised measures to prevent hepatitis C transmission in people who inject drugs are needle and syringe programmes. As people who inject drugs are at considerable risk of hepatitis C transmission, understanding the barriers they encounter when accessing needle and syringe programmes is important to support the hepatitis C elimination goal.

Objective

This integrative review aimed to synthesise research exploring the barriers to accessing sterile injecting equipment faced by people who inject drugs.

Methods

An integrative review was conducted guided by the PRISMA 2020 checklist, based on a systematic literature search using the following databases: CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Embase, psychology & behavioural sciences collection, and Emcare, as well as Google Scholar.

Results

The search returned seven studies which met the criteria, and four key themes were identified: stigma; experienced and internalised, purchase experience, practical issues, and fear of negative consequences. Participants reported barriers such as the location of the services, and concerns around confidentiality when accessing services. In addition to this, the fear of arrest and the involvement of social services proved to discourage access to these services.

Conclusions

People who inject drugs face many challenges when accessing sterile injecting equipment, such as stigma, purchase experience, practical issues and fears and concerns. To support the World Health Organisation Hepatitis C virus elimination plan, these barriers must be tackled to maximise the provision and reduce hepatitis C transmission and reinfection rates. Since the level of research on this topic is limited, further studies are strongly needed.

No patient or public contribution

Patient and public involvement were not used for this review.

Dorsogluteal intramuscular injection depth needed to reach muscle tissue according to body mass index and gender: A systematic review

Abstract

Aims and objective(s)

The objective of this systematic review was to determine the needle length required to reach the dorsogluteal muscle based on body mass index and sex. Our aim was to provide evidence-based recommendations to current intramuscular injection guidelines from the result(s) of this review.

Background

Studies worldwide are documenting reduced medication effectiveness due to improperly placed dorsogluteal intramuscular injections because of incorrect needle length, wrong site selection and/or obesity. Current intramuscular injection guidelines lack specific instructions according to weight or sex. While there are similar concerns with other injectable sites, this review focuses solely on adult dorsogluteal intramuscular injections.

Design

A systematic review of relevant literature of dorsogluteal intramuscular injections based on body mass index and sex.

Methods

This systematic review was reported using the PRISMA checklist 2020. The review protocol was registered with Center for Open Science (OSF). We analysed 1,412 articles from nine databases. We compared twelve studies that utilised computerised tomography or ultrasonography using The Johns Hopkins Evidence-Based Practice Model and Guidelines.

Results

A significant number of dorsogluteal intramuscular injections are administered into subcutaneous tissue rather than muscle because needles are too short for populations with body mass indexes over 25, especially women. Poor landmarking often results in improperly placed injections.

Conclusions

To prevent administering a dorsogluteal intramuscular injection into subcutaneous tissue, women with a BMI of 25 and over require needles longer than 38 mm (1.5 inches). Men have less subcutaneous tissue in the dorsogluteal area and only require longer needles if BMI is 35 and over. If skin-to-muscle depth is questionable in either sex, an ultrasound-guided intramuscular injection is warranted for accurate dorsogluteal placement. Landmarking and needle length are key to appropriately placed IM injections.

Relevance to clinical practice

Dorsogluteal injections are often injected into subcutaneous tissue rather than muscle because needles are not long enough to reach muscle, especially in women. Critical elements that determine placement of intramuscular injections into muscle versus subcutaneous tissue are sex, BMI, needle length and landmarking.

Medications delivered into subcutaneous tissue may have reduced bioavailability.

Increasing accuracy in documentation through the application of a structured emergency nursing framework: A multisite quasi‐experimental study

Abstract

Aims and Objectives

To determine if the use of an emergency nursing framework improves the accuracy of clinical documentation.

Background

Accurate clinical documentation is a nursing professional responsibility essential for high-quality and safe patient care. The use of the emergency nursing framework “HIRAID” (History, Identify Red flags, Assessment, Interventions, Diagnostics, reassessment and communication) improves emergency nursing care by reducing treatment delays and improving escalation of clinical deterioration. The effect of HIRAID on the accuracy of nursing documentation is unknown.

Design

A quasi-experimental pre-post study was conducted and the report was guided by the strengthening the reporting of observational studies in epidemiology (STROBE) checklist.

Methods

HIRAID was implemented in four regional/rural Australian emergency departments (ED) using a range of behaviour change strategies. The blinded electronic healthcare records of 120 patients with a presenting problem of shortness of breath, abdominal pain or fever were reviewed. Quantity measures of completeness and qualitative measures of completeness and linguistic correctness of documentation adapted from the D-Catch tool were used to assess accuracy. Differences between pre-post groups were analysed using Wilcoxon rank-sum and two-sample t-tests for continuous variables. Pearson's Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used for the categorical data.

Results

The number of records containing the essential assessment components of emergency care increased significantly from pre- to post-implementation of HIRAID. This overall improvement was demonstrated in both paediatric and adult populations and for all presentation types. Both the quantitative and qualitative measures of documentation on patient history and physical assessment findings improved significantly.

Conclusion

Use of HIRAID improves the accuracy of clinical documentation of the patient history and physical assessment in both adult and paediatric populations.

Relevance to Clinical Practice

The emergency nursing framework “HIRAID” is recommended for use in clinical practice to increase the documentation accuracy performed by emergency nurses.

Issue Information

Journal of Clinical Nursing, Volume 31, Issue 19-20, Page 2663-2664, October 2022.

Illness uncertainty, self‐perceived burden and quality of life in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia: A cross‐sectional study

Abstract

Aims and objectives

To investigate the relationship between illness uncertainty, self-perceived burden and quality of life and explore the mediating role of self-perceived burden between illness uncertainty and quality of life in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia.

Background

Patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia need long-term, potentially lifelong therapy to control the disease, which affects their quality of life. There is a need for exploring potentially changeable factors to develop interventions. Little is known about the effects of illness uncertainty and self-perceived burden on quality of life in this population.

Design

A cross-sectional study.

Methods

A convenience sample of 248 patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia was recruited from four university hospitals from February to August 2020. Participants were assessed with the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale, Self-Perceived Burden Scale, and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire. The STROBE checklist was used to report the results.

Results

Illness uncertainty and self-perceived burden were negatively associated with quality of life in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia. Self-perceived burden partially mediated the relationship between illness uncertainty and quality of life. The indirect effect was −0.101, accounting for 22.9% of the total effect.

Conclusion

The findings revealed the relationship between illness uncertainty, self-perceived burden and quality of life in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia. Self-perceived burden exerted a mediating role between illness uncertainty and quality of life in this population.

Relevance to clinical practice

This study alerts healthcare providers to pay attention to patients’ illness uncertainty and self-perceived burden, which can contribute to develop effective interventions to improve the quality of life among patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia in the clinical practice.

A cross‐practice context exploration of nursing preparedness and comfort to care for people with intellectual disability and autism

Abstract

Aims and Objectives

To compare the self-perceived preparedness, knowledge, comfort and confidence of Australian Registered Nurses when caring for people with ID and/or ASD across contexts of practice: primary care and community, intensive care, acute hospital, emergency department, paediatrics and ID/ASD.

Background

There is limited research comparing nursing preparedness and competency when caring for people with intellectual disability (ID) and/or autism (ASD) across nursing contexts of practice. A greater understanding of the differed educational preparedness, confidence and comfort across contexts of practice can aid the development of tailored educational programmes to improve nursing capacity to care for this cohort.

Design

Cross-sectional descriptive study.

Methods

A descriptive survey tool of registered nurses (n = 69.3). Comparative inferential analysis was undertaken between the independent categorical variable of six nursing contexts of practice across several dependent variables including age, years since registration, educational content and exposure, knowledge, comfort and confidence. This cross-sectional study was undertaken according to the STROBE Statement checklist of items.

Results

Occupying an ID/ASD nursing role was significantly associated with higher reported levels of educational preparedness, professional development and postgraduate education relevant to caring for people with ID and/or ASD. Levels of self-reported knowledge of care issues, confidence and comfort when undertaking healthcare tasks was significantly associated with the context of practice, with nurses working in ID/ASD settings reporting the highest levels across all variables.

Conclusion

The findings of the study highlight an association between greater educational exposure to content relevant to working with people with ID/ASD and subsequently working in that field.

Relevance to clinical practice

This study has highlighted that professional development programmes aiming to improve nursing capacity to care for people with ID and/or ASD, should be informed by and address differing gaps in confidence, comfort and educational preparedness across nursing contexts of practice.

Experiences of endometriosis‐associated infertility among women and their partners: A qualitative systematic review

Abstract

Aims and Objectives

To consolidate and synthesise the current available literature regarding the experiences of endometriosis-associated infertility among women and their partners.

Background

Endometriosis is highly associated with infertility which in turn affects many women and their partners in their prime reproductive age.

Design

A qualitative systematic review and meta-synthesis was conducted using the PRISMA checklist.

Methods

Seven electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses) were searched until October 2020. Qualitative studies exploring the experiences of women and/or their partners aged 18 years and above with endometriosis-associated infertility regardless of marital or co-inhabitation status and sexual orientation were included. Studies examining women and/or partners without clinical diagnosis of endometriosis and studies which only focused on the psychosocial experiences of endometriosis were excluded. The Critical Appraisal Skills Program checklist was used to conduct quality appraisal while the Sandelowski and Barroso's two-step approach was used to meta-summarise and meta-synthesise the data from the included studies.

Results

Thirteen studies were included. Five themes (1) Emotional response to the diagnosis, (2) Influence on family planning, (3) Desperation to gradual acceptance, (4) Revision of expected life trajectories and (5) Altered dynamics within the couple unit were derived.

Conclusion

Endometriosis causes great psychological distress among women and their partners. Family planning decisions were especially challenging to make for the couples. Unsuccessful attempts at conceiving were extremely distressing but some couples eventually accepted their situation, with some opting for hysterectomy for health reasons.

Relevance to clinical practice

Current findings highlight the need for psychosocial support, in-depth fertility counselling and couple-based therapies to support the women with endometriosis and their partners.

Navigating asthma—the immigrant child in a tug‐of‐war: A constructivist grounded theory

Abstract

Background

Avoidable hospitalisation rates for Indian immigrant children with asthma is high in New Zealand and other Western countries. Understanding how children and their carers manage asthma may lead to a reduction in hospitalisation rates. The topic of asthma and Indian immigrant children's perspectives has not been investigated. Most studies on the topic focus on the experiences of family carers and health professionals. Practice cannot be advanced in the child's best interests unless the child's asthma experiences are explored. The following research addressed this gap by upholding Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, thereby giving Indian immigrant children a voice in describing their asthma experiences.

Design

Constructivist grounded theory.

Methods

Intensive interviews were conducted with ten family carers and nine children (eight to 17 years old). Child-sensitive data collection techniques such as drawing, and photography were used to facilitate interviewing children younger than 14 years. The COREQ guidelines guided the reporting of this study.

Results

The theory, navigating asthma: the immigrant child in a tug-of-war, is the resulting grounded theory with the tug-of-war being the basic social process. This theory comprises three main categories: being fearful, seeking support and clashing cultures. The data reflected two types of tug-of-war: one between two cultures, the native Indian and the host New Zealand culture and another between family carers' and children's preferences.

Conclusion

Acculturation and sociocultural factors may significantly influence the asthma experiences of Indian immigrants.

Relevance to clinical practice

The theory may assist healthcare practitioners to better comprehend Indian immigrants' asthma experiences within their wider sociocultural context. Our research indicates the need for healthcare practitioners to work in partnership with Indian immigrant families to implement culturally safe asthma management strategies.

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