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Exploring the use of ageing simulation to enable nurses to gain insight into what it is like to be an older person

Abstract

Aim

To explore the thoughts and experiences of aged care nurses following participation in an ageing‐suit simulation intervention.

Background

Globally, people are living longer and for nurses there are increasing challenges to meet the needs of the higher numbers of older people in hospital. Educating nurses to understand the ageing process and the experiences of older people in hospital is crucial to addressing these challenges. Ageing‐suits were identified as a possible approach to assist with these educational needs.

Design

This study adopted a qualitative descriptive design.

Method

A convenience sample of nurses (n=15) were selected from a single aged care ward. Volunteered nurses participated in a four‐hour ageing‐suit simulation session. Their immediate thoughts and experiences were explored via post‐simulation debriefs and three 30‐50 minute follow‐up focus groups were conducted at three months to explore perceptions on the impact of their experience on clinical practices. The data were analysed with the Braun and Clarke’s six‐step thematic analysis method. To ensure quality reporting of this study, the COREQ checklist was utilised (see supplementary file‐1)

Results

Data analysis generated three main themes. Nurses in the study highlighted that the experience of the ageing‐suit resulted in ‘it feels real’ (theme 1) and helped them in ‘enhancing understanding’ (theme 2) about older people and their practices, and supported a process of ‘changing me’ (theme 3).

Conclusion

Ageing‐suits are emerging as a promising innovative educational approach for aged care nurses to gain insight into the challenges of ageing and subsequently making changes to themselves and their individualised practices toward older people. Future research is required to determine if this educational approach is useful for a broader population of healthcare professionals.

Relevance to clinical practice

Ageing‐suits were identified as a worthwhile educational approach for aged care nurses to improve their specialised clinical practices with older people.

Caring for the carers in a public health district: A well‐being initiative to support healthcare professionals

Abstract

Aims and Objectives

To assess the impact of the proactive organisational resource allocation in terms of a 6‐week well‐being initiative to support public healthcare professionals' workplace engagement, well‐being and job satisfaction.

Background

Burnout of healthcare professionals can be a major cost to the Australian economy and public healthcare sector. According to the social exchange theory, when healthcare professionals perceive that their organisation proactively allocates resources to caring for its employees, then they are more likely to reciprocate and become more engaged in their work roles.

Design

The study used a pre‐ and postsurvey of healthcare professionals who participated in the well‐being initiative.

Methods

Between February–June 2019, 172 healthcare professionals were surveyed before and after a well‐being initiative. The survey included questions on workplace engagement, workplace well‐being and job satisfaction. Paired t tests were used to determine whether the difference between before and after averages was significant. The TREND statement was used to ensure the quality reporting of this study.

Results

The well‐being initiative had a positive impact on the healthcare professionals involved in the initiative. Nursing staff benefitted the most from the well‐being initiative, while the full‐time staff members and highly experienced demonstrated an increase in engagement.

Conclusion

Well‐being initiatives can be a targeted strategy to help alleviate burnout amongst healthcare professionals and build a mutually beneficial relationship between management and employees.

Relevance to clinical practice

This study shows how implementing a staff well‐being initiative increases workplace engagement, which benefits both the individual and the organisation.

The Use of Data Collected From mHealth Apps to Inform Evidence‐Based Quality Improvement: An Integrative Review

Abstract

Background

The global acceptance and use of technology in health care has resulted in an abundance of mobile health (mHealth) applications (apps) available for use in the delivery and improvement of care. With so many apps available to patients and clinicians, it is important to understand how data from apps are being used to inform quality improvement in practice.

Aim

The aim of this integrative review is to establish current knowledge of how mHealth apps are used to produce data to inform quality improvement in health care.

Methods

Scopus, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Medline Plus Full Text databases were searched for peer‐reviewed papers written in English. The inclusion criteria comprised of full‐text, empirical research studies relating to mobile health application use (not development) in clinical care.

Results

Nineteen studies met inclusion criteria. The functions of the apps outlined in the studies can be summarized into four different categories: communication, illness management, clinical management, and education/information. The types of data collected by the apps included numerical, textual, photographic, and graphical with several apps able to collect a variety of data types. Analysis of the studies showed that although data collection is rarely outlined as the explicit purpose of mHealth apps, data collected through such technology are and can be used to inform practice change both in real time and retrospectively.

Linking Evidence to Action

This review highlights while this is an emerging area, data obtained from mHealth apps can and are being used to inform quality improvement in health care. Further research is required in this area to adequately understand how data from mHealth apps can be used to produce quality improvement, specifically in relation to nursing. This review also highlights a need for the development of apps that aim to capture data to inform quality improvement, particularly from the patient perspective.

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