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Analyses of medical coping styles and related factors among female patients undergoing in vitro fertilization and embryonic transfer

by Liwen Shen, Lanfeng Xing

Objective

This study investigated the medical coping styles of female patients treated with in vitro fertilization and embryonic transfer (IVF-ET), and analyzed the effects of alexithymia and social support on their choice of coping style.

Methods

A survey was conducted with 285 female patients undergoing IVF-ET in a reproductive medical center of a third-grade class-A hospital in China using the Medical Coping Modes Questionnaire, the Social Support Rating Scale, and the Toronto Alexithymia scale.

Results

Patients who underwent IVF-ET treatment had a higher score for avoidance as a coping mode than did normal controls. Utilization of social support predicted the use of confrontation as a coping style. Difficulty identifying feelings, objective support, and utilization of social support were factors in the choice of avoidance as a coping style, and length of infertility treatment, difficulty identifying feelings, and subjective support predicted patients’ use of the acceptance-resignation as a coping style.

Conclusion

Patients who undergo IVF-ET generally select the coping style of avoidance, which is not conducive to treatment. Targeted intervention strategies should be developed based on the factors influencing patients’ choice of coping style(s) to guide them in choosing positive coping methods, improve compliance, and achieve successful pregnancy outcomes.

Innate signalling molecules as genetic adjuvants do not alter the efficacy of a DNA-based influenza A vaccine

by Dennis Lapuente, Viktoria Stab, Michael Storcksdieck genannt Bonsmann, Andre Maaske, Mario Köster, Han Xiao, Christina Ehrhardt, Matthias Tenbusch

In respect to the heterogeneity among influenza A virus strains and the shortcomings of current vaccination programs, there is a huge interest in the development of alternative vaccines that provide a broader and more long-lasting protection. Gene-based approaches are considered as promising candidates for such flu vaccines. In our study, innate signalling molecules from the RIG-I and the NALP3 pathways were evaluated as genetic adjuvants in intramuscular DNA immunizations. Plasmids encoding a constitutive active form of RIG-I (cRIG-I), IPS-1, IL-1β, or IL-18 were co-administered with plasmids encoding the hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein derived from H1N1/Puerto Rico/8/1934 via electroporation in BALB/c mice. Immunogenicity was analysed in detail and efficacy was demonstrated in homologous and heterologous influenza challenge experiments. Although the biological activities of the adjuvants have been confirmed by in vitro reporter assays, their single or combined inclusion in the vaccine did not result in superior vaccine efficacy. With the exception of significantly increased levels of antigen-specific IgG1 after the co-administration of IL-1β, there were only minor alterations concerning the immunogenicity. Since DNA electroporation alone induced substantial inflammation at the injection site, as demonstrated in this study using Mx2-Luc reporter mice, it might override the adjuvants´ contribution to the inflammatory microenvironment and thereby minimizes the influence on the immunogenicity. Taken together, the DNA immunization was protective against subsequent challenge infections but could not be further improved by the genetic adjuvants analysed in this study.

Co-culture of induced pluripotent stem cells with cardiomyocytes is sufficient to promote their differentiation into cardiomyocytes

by Axel J. Chu, Eric Jiahua Zhao, Mu Chiao, Chinten James Lim

Various types of stem cells and non-stem cells have been shown to differentiate or transdifferentiate into cardiomyocytes by way of co-culture with appropriate inducer cells. However, there is a limited demonstration of a co-culture induction system utilizing stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes as a stimulatory source for cardiac reprogramming (of stem cells or otherwise). In this study, we utilized an inductive co-culture method to show that previously differentiated induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iCMs), when co-cultivated with iPS cells, constituted a sufficient stimulatory system to induce cardiac differentiation. To enable tracking of both cell populations, we utilized GFP-labeled iPS cells and non-labeled iCMs pre-differentiated using inhibitors of GSK and Wnt signaling. Successful differentiation was assessed by the exhibition of spontaneous self-contractions, structural organization of α-actinin labeled sarcomeres, and expression of cardiac specific markers cTnT and α-actinin. We found that iCM-iPS cell-cell contact was essential for inductive differentiation, and this required overlaying already adherent iPS cells with iCMs. Importantly, this process was achieved without the exogenous addition of pathway inhibitors and morphogens, suggesting that ‘older’ iCMs serve as an adequate stimulatory source capable of recapitulating the necessary culture environment for cardiac differentiation.

Becoming a Good Nurse – Socialisation of Newly Employed Nurses into the Oncological Clinic

Abstract

Aim and objectives

To explore newly employed nurses’ socialisation in the process of introduction into an oncological clinic from the perspectives of unit managers and newly employed nurses.

Background

There are managerial challenges in retaining nurses at workplaces. The way in which nurses are socialised into their work is important for their job satisfaction and retainment.

Method

Qualitative, semi‐structured interviews with seven nurses and two unit managers, and written introductory material. Thematic analyses were made, inspired by Goffman’s concepts of social interaction, back stage, front stage and roles. SRQR checklist was used.

Results

Unit managers created the framework for socialising newly employed nurses through written introductory guidelines and assignments of supervisors as mainstream role models. Newly employed nurses were socialised gradually through mirroring their supervisors in their role as nurse. Front stage, patients often functioned as objects for newly employed nurses’ training. Back stage, patients often functioned as communication objects for all professionals. Newly employed nurses, who also demand roles such as transformer, boss, coordinator, prompter and friend, were socialised into the role of assistant to the doctor. Medical rounds functioned as a socialisator in this process.

Conclusion

The allocated supervisors were role models in socialising newly employed nurses into an oncological clinic and its culture. Nurses were socialised into an understanding of care as a biomedical orientation, in which medicine had a higher value than care in the existing knowledge hierarchy at the oncological clinic. This might have implications for who applies for and stays in the job.

Relevance to clinical practice

Increased awareness of the importance of socialisation of nurses into the clinic during the introduction process. Re‐thinking nurses’ independent functions and patient perspectives in introduction of newly employed nurses to maintain and develop nursing as an independent profession.

The efficacy and safety of cold atmospheric plasma as a novel therapy for diabetic wound in vitro and in vivo

Abstract

Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is a group of various chemical active species, such as ozone and nitric oxide, generated by working gas. CAP was demonstrated to have an effect on tissue regeneration and wound healing. We conducted this study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CAP as a novel therapy for diabetic wounds in vitro and in vivo. The plasma consists of ionised helium gas that is produced by a high‐voltage and high‐frequency power supply. Eight‐week‐old male db/db mice and C57BL mice were treated with helium gas (control group), 90s' CAP (low‐dose group), and 180s' CAP (high‐dose group). Mice were treated and observed for 2 weeks. Skin samples from around the wound and blood samples were collected. Our in vitro analysis included scratch wound‐healing assays by using human HaCaT immortalised human epidermal cells. After 14 days of treatment, CAP could obviously promote diabetic wound healing. Wound closure rates were significantly higher in the low‐dose group and high‐dose groups compared with the control group. Meanwhile, compared with the control group, the protein expression of IL‐6, tumour necrosis factor‐α, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and superoxide dismutase in two CAP groups significantly decreased, while the protein expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor‐β in two CAP groups significantly increased (all P < .05); these data show good agreement with the change in mRNA level (all P < .05). In vitro, scratch wound‐healing assays showed that plasma treatment could effectively ensure healing within 3 minutes of exposure (all P < .05). In addition, no difference was found in histological observations of normal skin and the level of serum alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and white blood cells among the CAP groups and control group. CAP treatment for 3 minutes every day improves wound healing in diabetic mice by suppressing inflammation, reducing oxidative stress, and enhancing angiogenesis, involving several proteins signalling, and it is safe for the liver and kidney.

Clinical and economic burden of wound care in the tropics: a 5‐year institutional population health review

Abstract

The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical and economic burden of wound care in the Tropics via a 5‐year institutional population health review. Within our data analysis, wounds are broadly classified into neuro‐ischaemic ulcers (NIUs), venous leg ulcers (VLUs), pressure injuries (PIs), and surgical site infections (SSIs). Between 2013 and 2017, there were a total of 56 583 wound‐related inpatient admissions for 41 461 patients, with a 95.1% increase in wound episodes per 1000 inpatient admissions over this period (142 and 277 wound episodes per 1000 inpatient admissions in 2013 and 2017, respectively). In 2017, the average length of stay for each wound episode was 17.7 days, which was 2.4 times that of an average acute admission at our institution. The average gross charge per wound episode was USD $12 967. Among the 12 218 patients with 16 674 wound episodes in 2017, 71.5% were more than 65 years of age with an average Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) of 7.2. Half (51.9%) were moderately or severely frail, while 41.3% had two or more wound‐related admission episodes. In 2017, within our healthcare cluster, the gross healthcare costs for all inpatient wound episodes stand at USD $216 million within hospital care and USD $596 000 within primary care. Most NIU patients (97.2%) had diabetes and they had the most comorbidities (average CCI 8.4) and were the frailest group of patients (44.9% severely frail). The majority of the VLU disease burden was at the specialist outpatient setting, with the average 1‐year VLU recurrence rate at 52.5% and median time between healing and recurrence at 9.5 months. PI patients were the oldest (86.5% more than 65 years‐old), constituted the largest cohort of patients with 3874 patients at an incidence of 64.6 per 1000 admissions in 2017, and have a 1‐year all‐cause mortality rate of 14.3%. For SSI patients, there was a 125% increase of 14.2 SSI wound episodes per 1000 inpatient admissions in 2013 to 32.0 in 2017, and a 413% increase in wound‐related 30‐day re‐admissions, from 40 in 2013 (4.1% of all surgeries) to 205 (8.3% of all surgeries) in 2017. The estimated gross healthcare cost per patient ranges from USD $15789–17 761 across the wound categories. Similar to global data, there is a significant and rising trend in the clinical and economic burden of wound care in Tropics.

Hospital response to the COVID‐19 outbreak: the experience in Shanghai, China

Abstract

On 20th January 2020, the first COVID‐19 case was reported in Shanghai, China. As of 12th March 2020, 344 cases with laboratory‐confirmed COVID‐19 infection have been detected in Shanghai, of which three died, 321 patients are discharged, 20 patients still receive ongoing treatments (Shanghai Municipal Health Commission, 2020).

Characterization of the fungal community in the canopy air of the invasive plant <i>Ageratina adenophora</i> and its potential to cause plant diseases

by Lin Chen, Kai Fang, Xing-Fan Dong, Ai-Ling Yang, Yu-Xuan Li, Han-Bo Zhang

Airborne fungi and their ecological functions have been largely ignored in plant invasions. In this study, high-throughput sequencing technology was used to characterize the airborne fungi in the canopy air of the invasive weed Ageratina adenophora. Then, representative phytopathogenic strains were isolated from A. adenophora leaf spots and their virulence to A.adenophora as well as common native plants in the invaded range was tested. The fungal alpha diversities were not different between the sampling sites or between the high/low part of the canopy air, but fungal co-occurrences were less common in the high than in the low part of the canopy air. Interestingly, we found that the phytopathogenic Didymellaceae fungi co-occurred more frequently with themselves than with other fungi. Disease experiments indicated that all 5 Didymellaceae strains could infect A. adenophora as well as the 16 tested native plants and that there was large variation in the virulence and host range. Our data suggested that the diverse pathogens in the canopy air might be a disease infection source that weakens the competition of invasive weeds, a novel phenomenon that remains to be explored in other invasive plants.

Associations between symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing and maternal sleep patterns with late stillbirth: Findings from an individual participant data meta-analysis

by Robin S. Cronin, Jessica Wilson, Adrienne Gordon, Minglan Li, Vicki M. Culling, Camille H. Raynes-Greenow, Alexander E. P. Heazell, Tomasina Stacey, Lisa M. Askie, Edwin A. Mitchell, John M. D. Thompson, Lesley M. E. McCowan, Louise M. O’Brien

Background and objectives

Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) affects up to one third of women during late pregnancy and is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, including hypertension, diabetes, impaired fetal growth, and preterm birth. However, it is unclear if SDB is associated with late stillbirth (≥28 weeks’ gestation). The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-reported symptoms of SDB and late stillbirth.

Methods

Data were obtained from five case-control studies (cases 851, controls 2257) from New Zealand (2 studies), Australia, the United Kingdom, and an international study. This was a secondary analysis of an individual participant data meta-analysis that investigated maternal going-to-sleep position and late stillbirth, with a one-stage approach stratified by study and site. Inclusion criteria: singleton, non-anomalous pregnancy, ≥28 weeks’ gestation. Sleep data (‘any’ snoring, habitual snoring ≥3 nights per week, the Berlin Questionnaire [BQ], sleep quality, sleep duration, restless sleep, daytime sleepiness, and daytime naps) were collected by self-report for the month before stillbirth. Multivariable analysis adjusted for known major risk factors for stillbirth, including maternal age, body mass index (BMI kg/m2), ethnicity, parity, education, marital status, pre-existing hypertension and diabetes, smoking, recreational drug use, baby birthweight centile, fetal movement, supine going-to-sleep position, getting up to use the toilet, measures of SDB and maternal sleep patterns significant in univariable analysis (habitual snoring, the BQ, sleep duration, restless sleep, and daytime naps). Registration number: PROSPERO, CRD42017047703.

Results

In the last month, a positive BQ (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02–2.04), sleep duration >9 hours (aOR 1.82, 95% CI 1.14–2.90), daily daytime naps (aOR 1.52, 95% CI 1.02–2.28) and restless sleep greater than average (aOR 0.62, 95% CI 0.44–0.88) were independently related to the odds of late stillbirth. ‘Any’ snoring, habitual snoring, sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, and a positive BQ excluding the BMI criterion, were not associated.

Conclusion

A positive BQ, long sleep duration >9 hours, and daily daytime naps last month were associated with increased odds of late stillbirth, while sleep that is more restless than average was associated with reduced odds. Pregnant women may be reassured that the commonly reported restless sleep of late pregnancy may be physiological and associated with a reduced risk of late stillbirth.

Prognostic significance of inflammatory indices in hepatocellular carcinoma treated with transarterial chemoembolization: A systematic review and meta-analysis

by Shuangshuang Li, Xudong Feng, Guodong Cao, Qianhui Wang, Ling Wang

Objectives

To investigate the association between inflammatory indices and clinical outcomes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients treated with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) by performing meta-analysis.

Methods

A systematic literature search for relevant studies published up to August 2019 was performed by using PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI) and Wanfang databases. Pooled hazard ratios (HR) or odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated.

Results

A total of 5280 patients from 22 studies were finally enrolled in the meta-analysis. The results demonstrated that elevated preoperative NLR, PLR, and CRP was associated with poor OS in HCC patients treated by TACE (HR = 1.81, P3 cm (OR = 2.42, P = 0.005).

Conclusions

Elevated preoperative NLR, PLR, and CRP are associated with poor prognosis in HCC patients treated with TACE. These inflammatory indices may be convenient, accessible, affordable and dependable biomarkers with prognostic potential for HCC patients treated by TACE.

Young adults’ BMI and changes in romantic relationship status during the first semester of college

by Irene van Woerden, Alexandra Brewis, Daniel Hruschka, Genevieve Dunton, Marc A. Adams, Meg Bruening

Purpose

Identify how higher Body Mass Index (BMI) and weight discrimination are associated with romantic relationship formation and termination in young adults, and if the association was consistent for males and females.

Methods

First-year students (N = 1096) at entry to university (Time 1) provided BMI and self-reports of weight discrimination and romantic relationship status (in a relationship vs single); 550 were successfully resampled four months later (Time 2). Logistic generalized estimating equations (GEEs) examined if Time 1 relationship status was predicted by BMI and weight discrimination. Logistic GEEs were used to determine if Time 1 BMI and weight discrimination predicted Time 2 relationship status for the strata of students in, and out, of a relationship at Time 1.

Results

At baseline, students were less likely to be in a relationship if they had a higher BMI (OR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.92, 0.96) or reported weight discrimination (OR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.53, 0.90). When stratified by gender, the association between higher BMI and weight discrimination with relationship status was only observed for females. Longitudinally, a BMI-based selection effect was observed for romantic relationship formation, but not termination. Of the students who were single at Time 1, each one unit higher baseline BMI decreased the odds of the student transitioning to a relationship by 9% at Time 2 (OR = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.85, 0.96). When stratified by gender the association of higher BMI decreased odds of relationship formation was only significant for females. No weight discrimination differences for selection in or out of a romantic relationship were observed.

Conclusions

These findings suggest a weight-related selection effect for romantic relationship initiation, but not termination, in young female adults with lower BMIs. Weight discrimination was not associated with romantic relationship initiation or termination in this sample.

Translation and cultural adaptation of a prostate cancer screening decision aid: a qualitative study in Portugal

Por: Baptista · S. · Heleno · B. · Pinto · M. · Guimaraes · B. · China · D. · Ramos · J. P. · Teixeira · A. · Taylor · K. L. · Martins · C.
Objectives

To translate and culturally adapt an English language patient decision aid addressing prostate cancer screening, so it can be used by Portuguese men.

Design

Qualitative study. We followed the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control’s (ECDC) five-step, stakeholder-based approach to adapting health communication materials: (1) selection of materials and process coordinators, (2) early review, (3) translation and back translation, (4) comprehension testing with cognitive semi-structured interviews and (5) proofreading. Content analysis was performed using Ligre software.

Setting and participants

Cognitive interviews with 15 men to refine a decision aid after its translation. Eligible participants were Portuguese native-speaking men aged 55–69 years old recruited from the local community (urban and suburban) of Oporto district through advertisements in social media and senior universities between January and March 2019. A previous diagnosis of prostate cancer was the single exclusion criterion.

Results

Five main themes are presented: informational content, information comprehension, sociocultural appropriateness, feelings and main message and personal perspective concerning prostate cancer screening. Most men found the translated version of the decision aid to be clear, comprehensive and appropriate for its target population, although some suggested that medical terms could be a barrier. The data collected from men’s interviews afforded the researchers the opportunity to clarify concepts and expand existing content.

Conclusions

A decision aid was successfully translated and adapted to the Portuguese cultural setting. Our ECDC based approach can be replicated by other workgroups to translate and culturally adapt decision aids.

Hours lying down per day, as a proxy for sedentary behaviour and risk of diabetes in young and middle-aged adults in Norway: an 11-year follow-up of the HUNT study

Por: Asante · E. O. · Sun · Y.-Q. · Nilsen · T. I. L. · Asvold · B. O. · Sorgjerd · E. P. · Mai · X.-M.
Objective

We aimed to examine relationship between hours lying down per day, as a proxy for sedentary behaviour and risk of diabetes in young and middle-aged adults, and to assess if leisure-time physical activity and body mass index (BMI) modified this relationship.

Design

A population-based prospective cohort study.

Setting

Nord-Trøndelag, Norway.

Participants

The cohort included 17 058 diabetes-free adults, at an age of 20–55 years in 1995–1997, who were followed-up to 2006–2008.

Primary outcome measures

Incident diabetes was defined by self-report of diabetes or non-fasting glucose levels greater than 11 mmol/L at the follow-up.

Methods

Multivariable logistic regression models were used to obtain OR with 95% CI for risk of diabetes by the categories of hours lying down (≤7, 8 and ≥9 hours/day).

Results

362 individuals (2.1%) developed diabetes during an average of 11-year follow-up. Individuals who reported lying down ≥9 hours/day had an adjusted OR of 1.35 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.80) for incident diabetes compared with those lying down 8 hours/day. Lying down ≤7 hours/day was not associated with the risk of diabetes. In analysis stratified by physical activity, the ORs associated with lying down ≥9 hours/day were 1.41 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.90) and 0.90 (95% CI 0.23 to 3.55), respectively, among the less active and highly active individuals (pinteraction=0.048). There was little evidence that the association differed by BMI status (pinteraction=0.62).

Conclusions

Prolonged hours lying down per day was associated with an increased risk of diabetes in young and middle-aged adults. The positive association appeared to be modified by physical activity but not by BMI.

Impact of the test and treat policy on delays in antiretroviral therapy initiation among adult HIV positive patients from six clinics in Johannesburg, South Africa: results from a prospective cohort study

Por: Onoya · D. · Sineke · T. · Hendrickson · C. · Mokhele · I. · Maskew · M. · Long · L. C. · Fox · M.
Objectives

To assess delays to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation before and after the Universal Test and Treat (UTT) and the same-day initiation (SDI) of ART policy periods in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Design

Prospective cohort study.

Setting

Patients were recruited from six primary health clinics in Johannesburg.

Participants

Overall, 1029 newly diagnosed HIV positive adults (≥18 years) were consecutively enrolled by referral from the testing counsellor between April and December 2015 (pre-UTT n=146), July and August 2017 (UTT, n=141) and October 2017 and August 2018 (SDI, n=742).

Main outcome measures

Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess predictors of 30 days ART initiation. Additionally, predictors of immediate ART initiation were evaluated using Poisson regression.

Results

Overall, 30 days ART proportions were 71.9% overall, 36.9% pre-UTT (44.3% of those eligible), 65.9% under UTT and 79.9% under the SDI policy. The median days to ART initiation declined from 21 pre-UTT (IQR: 15–30) to 8 (IQR: 6–16) under UTT and 5 days (IQR: 0–8) under the SDI policy. However, only 150 (20.2%) of the SDI cohort-initiated ART immediately after HIV diagnosis. Living in a two-adult home (adjusted HR (aHR) 1.2 vs living alone, 95% CI 1.0 to 1.5) increased the likelihood of 30-day ART. Missing baseline cluster of differentiation four (CD4) data decreased the likelihood of 30 days ART by 40% (aHR 0.6 vs CD4 10 months, 95% CI 0.1 to 0.4).

Conclusions

The study results highlight a positive move towards earlier ART initiation during the UTT and SDI periods and emphasise a need to increase same-day ART implementation further.

Use of healthcare services and assistive devices among centenarians: results of the cross-sectional, international5-COOP study

Por: Dupraz · J. · Andersen-Ranberg · K. · Fors · S. · Herr · M. · Herrmann · F. R. · Wakui · T. · Jeune · B. · Robine · J.-M. · Saito · Y. · Santos-Eggimann · B. · On behalf of the 5-COOP group · Christensen · Oksuzyan · Balard · Arai · Hirose · Masui · Inagaki · Gondo · Kamide · Willcox
Objectives

To measure the use of healthcare services and assistive devices by centenarians in five countries.

Design

Cross-sectional study using a survey questionnaire.

Setting

Community-dwelling and institutionalised centenarians living in Japan, France, Switzerland, Sweden and Denmark.

Participants

1253 participants aged 100 or in their 100th year of life, of whom 1004 (80.1%) were female and 596 (47.6%) lived in institutions.

Main outcome measures

Recent use of medical visits, nursing care at home, home-delivered meals, acute care hospital stays overnight, professional assessments such as sight tests, mobility aids and other assistive devices. A set of national healthcare system indicators was collected to help interpret differences between countries.

Results

There was considerable variability in the healthcare services and assistive devices used by centenarians depending on their country and whether they were community-dwelling or institutionalised. In contrast to the relatively homogeneous rates of hospitalisation in the past year (around 20%), community-dwelling centenarians reported widely ranging rates of medical visits in the past 3 months (at least one visit, from 32.2% in Japan to 86.6% in France). The proportion of community-dwellers using a mobility device to get around indoors (either a walking aid or a wheelchair) ranged from 48.3% in Japan to 79.2% in Sweden. Participants living in institutions and reporting the use of a mobility device ranged from 78.6% in Japan to 98.2% in Denmark.

Conclusions

Our findings suggest major differences in care received by centenarians across countries. Some may result from the characteristics of national healthcare systems, especially types of healthcare insurance coverage and the amounts of specific resources available. However, unexplored factors also seem to be at stake and may be partly related to personal health and cultural differences.

Living a life, not an illness: the process of living well with advanced cancer

Por: Harrison · J. · Devereux · J.

Commentary on: Arantzamendi M, Garcia-Rueda N, Carvajal A, et al. People with advanced cancer: the process of living well with awareness of dying. Qual Health Res 2018. doi: 10.1177/1049732318816298. [Epub ahead of print 12 Dec 2018].

Implications for practice and research

  • The process of living well with advanced cancer revolves around an ‘awareness of dying’. This leads to a focus on living a life rather than living an illness.

  • To support development of the theory, future research should explore its applicability in both a family perspective and different cultural contexts.

  • Context

    Little is known about the process of living well with advanced cancer or how to support it.1 The study addresses this by collating the experiences of people living with advanced cancer and comparing them with the ‘Theory of Living Well with Chronic Illness’.2 The authors were familiar with the...

    Complications and outcomes of urgent-start peritoneal dialysis in elderly patients with end-stage renal disease in China: a retrospective cohort study

    Por: Zang · X. · Du · X. · Li · L. · Mei · C.
    Objectives

    To investigate the complications and survival of elderly patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who received urgent-start peritoneal dialysis (USPD) or urgent-start haemodialysis (USHD), and to explore the value of peritoneal dialysis (PD) as the emergent dialysis method for elderly patients with ESRD.

    Design

    Retrospective cohort study.

    Setting

    Two tertiary care hospitals in Shanghai, China.

    Participants

    Chinese patients (n=542) >65 years of age with estimated glomerular filtration rate ≤15 mL/min/m2 who received urgent-start dialysis between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2015, and with at least 3 months of treatment. Patients who converted to other dialysis methods, regardless of the initial dialysis method, were excluded, as well as those with comorbidities that could significantly affect their dialysis outcomes.

    Primary and secondary outcome measures

    Dialysis-related complications and survival were compared. Patients were followed until death, stopped PD, transfer to other dialysis centres, loss to follow-up or 31 December 2016.

    Results

    There were 309 patients in the USPD group and 233 in the USHD group. The rate of dialysis-related complications within 30 days after catheter implantation was significantly lower in the USPD group compared with the USHD group (4.5% vs 10.7%, p=0.031). The 6-month and 1, 2 and 3-year survival rates were 95.3%, 91.4%, 86.6% and 64.8% in the USPD group, and 92.2%, 85.7%, 70.2% and 57.8% in the USHD group, respectively (p=0.023). The multivariable Cox regression analysis showed that USHD (HR=2.220, 95% CI 1.298 to 3.790; p=0.004), age (HR=1.025, 95% CI 1.013 to 1.043, p

    Conclusions

    USPD was associated with slightly better survival compared with USHD. USPD was associated with fewer complications and better survival than USHD in elderly patients with ESRD.

    Lubricant Investigation in Men to Inhibit Transmission of HPV Infection (LIMIT-HPV): design and methods for a randomised controlled trial

    Por: Laurie · C. · El-Zein · M. · Tota · J. · Tellier · P.-P. · Coutlee · F. · Franco · E. · de Pokomandy · A. · LIMIT-HPV study group · Rodrigues · Morykon · Rodrigues · Boutenm · Shapiro · Leblanc · Trottier · Castro · Proulx-Boucher · Theriault · Guenoun
    Introduction

    Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (gbMSM) have an increased risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV-associated diseases, such as anal cancer and anogenital warts. A carrageenan-based lubricant could prevent HPV infection, thereby reducing the disease burden in this population. This paper describes the protocol for the Lubricant Investigation in Men to Inhibit Transmission of HPV Infection (LIMIT-HPV) study, an ongoing randomised controlled trial (RCT), evaluating efficacy of a carrageenan-based personal lubricant in reducing type-specific anal HPV incidence and prevalence among sexually active gbMSM, efficacy by HIV status, safety and tolerability of the gel and participant adherence to the intervention.

    Methods and analysis

    The study is a double-blinded, placebo-controlled RCT. Volunteer gbMSM 18 years and older are randomly assigned 1:1 to receive the treatment (a self-applied anal microbicide gel with carrageenan) or placebo (a self-applied placebo gel). At each visit, computerised questionnaires are used to collect data on sociodemographic and clinical variables, lifestyle, sexual behaviour and the gels’ safety and tolerability. At baseline and each follow-up visit (months 1, 2, 3, 6, 9 and 12), nurses collect anal specimens tested for 36 HPV types (linear array assay). HIV status is determined at baseline and 12 months. The primary outcome is incidence of type-specific anal HPV infection(s) undetected at baseline. Secondary outcomes are prevalence of type-specific anal HPV infection, safety, tolerability and adherence. We aim to recruit 380 participants to attain the study’s objectives. Data will be analysed using intention-to-treat and per-protocol approaches with subgroup analyses by HIV status.

    Ethics and dissemination

    Ethics approval was obtained by the Research Ethics Boards of McGill University, the McGill University Health Centre, Concordia University and Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal. Trial results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations.

    Trial registration number

    NCT02354144.

    Minocycline for the treatment of mental health and neurological conditions: study protocol of a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Por: Bortolasci · C. C. · Marx · W. · Walker · A. J. · Hasebe · K. · Kavanagh · B. E. · Morris · M. J. · Mohebbi · M. · Turner · A. · Gray · L. · Berk · L. · Walder · K. · Berk · M. · Dean · O. M.
    Introduction

    Due to the anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-apoptotic properties of minocycline, clinical trials have evaluated the potential of this drug to treat several psychiatric and neurological disorders, including major depressive disorder, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, stroke and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This protocol proposes a systematic review (and potential meta-analysis) that aims to identify and critically evaluate randomised controlled trials of minocycline for treating psychiatric and neurological disorders.

    Methods and analysis

    PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials, PsycINFO and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) will be used to identify randomised controlled trials that used minocycline to treat psychiatric and neurological disorders. Double-blind, randomised, controlled, clinical trials of participants aged 18 years or older and written in English will be included in the review. Data will be extracted by two independent reviewers. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines will be followed and the Cochrane Collaboration’s ‘Risk of Bias’ tool will be used to assess the risk of bias in all studies included in the systematic review. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation system will be used to access the overall quality of the level of evidence of the studies. If sufficient evidence is identified, a meta-analysis will be conducted using the standardised mean difference approach and reported with 95% CIs. Heterogeneity of evidence will be evaluated using the I2 model.

    Ethics and dissemination

    This systematic review will evaluate only published data; therefore, ethical approval is not required. The systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at relevant research conferences.

    Trial registration number

    CRD42020153292.

    Short-term associations between ambient air pollution and stroke hospitalisations: time-series study in Shenzhen, China

    Por: Guo · Y. · Xie · X. · Lei · L. · Zhou · H. · Deng · S. · Xu · Y. · Liu · Z. · Bao · J. · Peng · J. · Huang · C.
    Objective

    To investigate the association between ambient air pollution and stroke morbidity in different subgroups and seasons.

    Methods

    We performed a time-series analysis based on generalised linear models to study the short-term exposure–response relationships between air pollution and stroke hospitalisations, and conducted subgroup analyses to identify possible sensitive populations.

    Results

    For every 10 µg/m3 increase in the concentration of air pollutants, across lag 0–3 days, the relative risk of stroke hospitalisation was 1.029 (95% CI 1.013 to 1.045) for PM2.5, 1.054 (95% CI 1.031 to 1.077) for NO2 and 1.012 (95% CI 1.002 to 1.022) for O3. Subgroup analyses showed that statistically significant associations were found in both men and women, middle-aged and older populations, and both cerebral infarction and intracerebral haemorrhage. The seasonal analyses showed that statistically significant associations were found only in the winter.

    Conclusions

    Our study indicates that short-term exposure to PM2.5, NO2 and O3 may induce stroke morbidity, and the government should take actions to mitigate air pollution and protect sensitive populations.

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