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Development of a 'universal-reporter outcome measure (UROM) for patient and healthcare professional completion: a mixed methods study demonstrating a novel concept for optimal questionnaire design

Por: Macefield · R. · Brookes · S. · Blazeby · J. · Avery · K. · On behalf of the Bluebelle Study Group* · Andronis · Blencowe · Calvert · Coast · Draycott · Donovan · Gooberman-Hill · Longman · Mathers · Pinkney · Reeves · Rogers · Torrance · Woodward · Ashton · Clayton · Clout · Dum
Objectives

To describe the novel concept of, and methods for developing, a ‘universal-reporter’ outcome measure (UROM); a single questionnaire for completion by patients and/or healthcare professionals (HCPs) when views on the same subject are required.

Design

A mixed methods study with three phases—phase I: identification of relevant content domains from existing clinical tools, patient questionnaires and in-depth interviews with multistakeholders; phase II: item development using a novel approach that considered plain language in conjunction with medical terminology; and phase III: pretesting with multistakeholders using cognitive interviews.

Setting

A case study in surgical wound assessment undertaken in two UK hospital trusts and one university setting.

Participants

Patients who had recently undergone general abdominal surgery and healthcare professionals involved in post-surgical wound care.

Results

Phase I: In the example case study, 19 relevant content domains were identified from two clinical tools, two patient questionnaires and 19 multistakeholder interviews (nine patients, 10 HCPs). Phase II: Domains were operationalised into items and subitems (secondary components to collect further information, if relevant). The version after pretesting had 16 items, five of which included further subitems. Plain language in conjunction with medical terminology was applicable in nine (27%) items/subitems. Phase III: Pretesting with 28 patients and 14 HCPs found that the UROM was acceptable to both respondent groups. An unanticipated secondary finding of the study was that the combined use of plain language and medical terminology during questionnaire development may be a useful, novel technique for evaluating item interpretation and thereby identifying items with inadequate content validity.

Conclusion

UROMs are a novel approach to outcome assessment that are acceptable to both patients and HCPs. Combining plain language and medical terminology during item development is a recommended technique to improve accuracy of item interpretation and content validity during questionnaire design. More work is needed to further validate this novel approach and explore the application of UROMs to other settings.

Sociodemographic, lifestyle and metabolic predictors of all-cause mortality in a cohort of community-dwelling population: an 18-year follow-up of the North West Adelaide Health Study

Por: Melaku · Y. A. · Gill · T. K. · Appleton · S. L. · Hill · C. · Boyd · M. A. · Adams · R. J.
Introduction

Studies examining potential factors of all-cause mortality comprehensively at community level are rare. Using long-term community-based follow-up study, we examined the association of sociodemographic and behavioural characteristics, metabolic and chronic conditions, and medication and health service utilisation with all-cause mortality.

Methods

We followed 4056 participants, aged 18–90 years, for 18 years in the North West Adelaide Health Study (NWAHS). Mortality data were obtained from South Australian (SA) public hospitals and registries including SA births, deaths and marriages, the National Death Index and the NWAHS follow-up. Predictors of all-cause mortality were explored using Cox proportional hazard model, adjusting for potential confounders. We performed subgroup analyses by sex and age.

Results

Mean (SD) age at baseline was 50.4 (16.4) years. Less than half (47.8%) of the participants were men. A total of 64 689.7 person-years from 4033 participants with 18.7 years of follow-up were generated. The median follow-up time was 17.7 years; 614 deaths were recorded. The overall crude death rate was 9.6 (95% CI 8.9 to 10.4) per 1000 person-years. After adjusting for potential confounders, a reduced risk of mortality was significantly associated with being separated or divorced, being in the highest Socioeconomic Indexes for Areas quintile, engaging in moderate exercise, being overweight (body mass index: 25.0–29.9 kg/m2) and per 10% increase in per cent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s. We found that the most important predictors of all-cause mortality were sociodemographic and behavioural characteristics. Sociodemographic factors were more important predictors of all-cause mortality in young age bracket compared with older people.

Conclusions

Socioeconomic factors were found to be the most important predictors of all-cause mortality. The study highlights the need to address the social inequalities and strengthen behavioural interventions for different subgroups of population to prevent premature deaths.

Developing and testing a matrix to achieve ready-everyday nursing standards (RENS): an observational study protocol

Por: Ratsch · A. · Sewell · F. · Pennington · A.
Introduction

The Australian Council on Healthcare Standards (ACHS) set criteria for the delivery of healthcare services in Australia. While a voluntary process, continual accreditation with ACHS is an expectation of, and for, Australian healthcare providers. Juxtapositioned with the ACHS, the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia (NMBA) set the mandatory practice requirements of, and for, Australian nurses. Despite these overarching quality and governance directives, a regional Queensland Hospital and Health Service (HHS) demonstrated deficits in the quality of nursing care. Accordingly, a HHS project was commissioned with the aim of producing a quantum shift in the quality of nursing services such that the service was ready-everyday for accreditation assessment, and nursing practice exemplified the NMBA standards.

Several barriers to achieving the aim were identified and it was considered that the implementation of critical system changes would structurally and operationally support the achievement of the aim. The system changes are pivoted around an interactive matrix that links nursing care services to the array of nursing professional and practice standards and provides real-time quantitative output measures. This paper outlines the protocol that will be used to establish, implement and evaluate the matrix.

Methods and analysis

A participatory action research design with a modified Delphi methodology will be used for the development the matrix. The organisational change management around the matrix implementation will be informed by Kotter’s model and supported by the use of the McKinsey 7S. The matrix implementation phase will be conducted using a modified Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services model. Quantitative and qualitative data will be collected over a 12 month pre-test/post-test design to measure the statistical significance of the matrix in supporting compliance with nursing standards and the achievement of quality nursing care. Quantitative data from quality of care assessments will be analysed using descriptive and comparative statistics. Qualitative data from staff surveys will be analysed by content analysis of the major themes (n~200).

Ethics and dissemination

The project has ethics approval from a Queensland Health Human Research Ethics Committee. Results will be reported to participants and other stakeholders at seminars and conferences and through peer-reviewed publications.

Risk factors for new ischaemic cerebral lesions after carotid artery stenting: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

Por: Feng · Y. · Li · L. · Bai · X. · Wang · T. · Chen · Y. · Zhang · X. · Ling · F. · Jiao · L.
Introduction

New ischaemic cerebral lesions (NICL) detected by diffusion-weighted imaging MRI are common after carotid artery stenting (CAS), with an occurrence rate ranging from 18% to 57%. Many studies reported occurrence of NICL could increase risk of future cerebrovascular events and cognitive impairment. However, controversies about determinants for occurrence of NICL after CAS exist among studies, and one risk factor embodied in an article may not be in another. Aim of this study is to introduce a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify risk factors associated with occurrence of NICL after CAS.

Methods and analysis

All relevant literature referring to risk factors for occurrence of NICL after CAS will be searched on the major databases, such as PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library until 31 December 2018. Literature, which must be randomised controlled trials, case–control studies or cohort studies, will be included in accordance with the prespecified eligibility criteria. The risk of bias will be assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration criteria and the quality of evidence will be assessed with the corresponding scale. Data will be extracted with a form prepared before and analysed using RevMan V.5.3 analyses software. Heterogeneity will be assessed using I2 statistic. Our systematic review will be performed according to the guidance from the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement.

Ethics and dissemination

There is no need for ethical approval because primary data will not be attained. The systematic review will be presented at international conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals.

PROSPERO registration number

CRD42019121129

Prevalence and factors associated with fatigue in the Lausanne middle-aged population: a population-based, cross-sectional survey

Por: Galland-Decker · C. · Marques-Vidal · P. · Vollenweider · P.
Objective

To assess the prevalence and factors associated with fatigue in the general population.

Design

Population-based, cross-sectional survey performed between May 2014 and April 2017.

Setting

General population of the city of Lausanne, Switzerland.

Participants

2848 participants (53.2% women, age range 45–86 years).

Primary outcome measure

Prevalence of fatigue the previous week, defined as a score of ≥4 using the Fatigue Severity Scale.

Results

The prevalence of fatigue was 21.9% (95% CI 20.4% to 23.4%) in the total sample. On bivariate analysis, participants with fatigue were younger, had a higher body mass index, a lower handgrip strength and lower ferritin levels. Participants with fatigue were more frequently women, had a lower educational level, presented more frequently with clinical insomnia, diabetes, anaemia, depression and low thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) values, had a higher consumption of antihistamines, antidepressants and hypnotics, and rated more frequently their health as bad or very bad. Multivariable analysis showed that obesity (OR 1.40 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.91)), insomnia categories (p value for trend

Conclusion

In a population-based sample aged 45–86, fatigue was present in one out of five subjects. Regarding clinical factors, sleep disturbances such as insomnia and sleep apnoea should be assessed first, followed by depression. Regarding biological factors, anaemia should be ruled out, while screening for hypothyroidism is not recommended as a first step. Sleep complaints and fatigue in older subjects are not due to ageing and should prompt identification of the underlying cause.

Guidance from key organisations on exploring, confirming and interpreting subgroup effects of medical treatments: a scoping review

Por: Wijn · S. R. W. · Rovers · M. M. · Le · L. H. · Belias · M. · Hoogland · J. · IntHout · J. · Debray · T. · Reitsma · J. B.
Objectives

With the increasing interest in personalised medicine, the use of subgroup analyses is likely to increase. Subgroup analyses are challenging and often misused, possibly leading to false interpretations of the effect. It remains unclear to what extent key organisations warn for such pitfalls and translate current methodological research to detect these effects into research guidelines. The aim of this scoping review is to determine and evaluate the current guidance used by organisations for exploring, confirming and interpreting subgroup effects.

Design

Scoping review.

Eligibility criteria

We identified four types of key stakeholder organisations: industry, health technology assessment organisations (HTA), academic/non-profit research organisations and regulatory bodies. After literature search and expert consultation, we identified international and national organisations of each type. For each organisation that was identified, we searched for official research guidance documents and contacted the organisation for additional guidance.

Results

Twenty-seven (45%) of the 60 organisations that we included had relevant research guidance documents. We observed large differences between organisation types: 18% (n=2) of the industry organisations, 64% (n=9) of the HTA organisations, 38% (n=8) of academic/non-profit research organisations and 57% (n=8) of regulatory bodies provided guidance documents. The majority of the documents (n=33, 63%) mentioned one or more challenges in subgroup analyses, such as false positive findings or ecological bias with variations across the organisation types. Statistical recommendations were less common (n=19, 37%) and often limited to a formal test of interaction.

Conclusions

Almost half of the organisations included in this scoping review provided guidance on subgroup effect research in their guidelines. However, there were large differences between organisations in the amount and level of detail of their guidance. Effort is required to translate and integrate research findings on subgroup analysis to practical guidelines for decision making and to reduce the differences between organisations and organisation types.

Body mass index and clinical outcomes in patients after ischaemic stroke in South Korea: a retrospective cohort study

Por: Choi · H. · Nam · H. S. · Han · E.
Objectives

Although obesity is a risk factor for stroke, its impact on mortality in patients with stroke remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and mortality due to ischaemic stroke among adults aged 20 years and above in Korea.

Design

Retrospective cohort study.

Setting

A tertiary-hospital-based stroke registry linked to the death records.

Participants

3599 patients admitted for ischaemic stroke from January 2007 to June 2013.

Outcome measures

The HRs for all-cause and stroke-related mortality were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models. Progression from stroke-related mortality was assessed using the Fine-Grey competing risk model, treating other-cause mortality as a competing risk. Adjustments were made for age, gender, smoking status, Charlson comorbidity index, cardiovascular or non-cardiovascular comorbidities, stroke severity, severity related to other medical conditions, complications and enrolment year. We repeated the analysis with stratification based on age groups (less than 65 vs 65 years and above).

Results

For stroke-related mortality, there was no significant difference among the four BMI groups. The risk of all-cause mortality was 36% higher in the underweight group than in the normal weight group (long-term HR=1.36, 95% CI: 1.04 to 1.79), whereas the mortality risk of the obese group was significantly lower (HR=0.66, 95% CI: 0.54 to 0.81). Although this relationship was not estimated in the younger group, it was found that obesity had a protective effect on the all-cause mortality in the elderly (long-term HR=0.66, 95% CI: 0.52 to 0.83).

Conclusions

Obesity is more likely to reduce mortality risk than normal weight, especially in elderly patients.

Motivating Structured walking Activity in people with Intermittent Claudication (MOSAIC): protocol for a randomised controlled trial of a physiotherapist-led, behavioural change intervention versus usual care in adults with intermittent claudication

Por: Bearne · L. · Galea Holmes · M. · Bieles · J. · Eddy · S. · Fisher · G. · Modarai · B. · Patel · S. · Peacock · J. L. · Sackley · C. · Volkmer · B. · Weinman · J.
Introduction

Walking exercise is a recommended but underused treatment for intermittent claudication caused by peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Addressing the factors that influence walking exercise may increase patient uptake of and adherence to recommended walking. The primary aim of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) is to evaluate the efficacy of a physiotherapist-led behavioural change intervention on walking ability in adults with intermittent claudication (MOtivating Structured walking Activity in people with Intermittent Claudication (MOSAIC)) in comparison with usual care.

Methods and analysis

The MOSAIC trial is a two-arm, parallel-group, single-blind RCT. 192 adults will be recruited from six National Health Service Hospital Trusts. Inclusion criteria are: aged ≥50 years, PAD (Ankle Brachial Pressure Index ≤0.90, radiographic evidence or clinician report) and intermittent claudication (San Diego Claudication Questionnaire), being able and willing to participate and provide informed consent. The primary outcome is walking ability (6 min walking distance) at 3 months. Outcomes will be obtained at baseline, 3 and 6 months by an assessor blind to group allocation. Participants will be individually randomised (n=96/group, stratified by centre) to receive either MOSAIC or usual care by an independent randomisation service. Estimates of treatment effects will use an intention-to-treat framework implemented using multiple regression adjusted for baseline values and centre.

Ethics and dissemination

This trial has full ethical approval (London—Bloomsbury Research Ethics Committee (17/LO/0568)). It will be disseminated via patient forums, peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations.

Trial registration number

ISRCTN14501418

Systematic reviews and meta-analyses comparing mortality in restrictive and liberal haemoglobin thresholds for red cell transfusion: protocol for an overview of systematic reviews

Por: Trentino · K. M. · Farmer · S. L. · Sanfilippo · F. M. · Leahy · M. F. · Isbister · J. · Mayberry · R. · Hofmann · A. · Murray · K.
Introduction

There has been a significant increase in the number of systematic reviews and meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials investigating thresholds for red blood cell transfusion. To systematically collate, appraise and synthesise the results of these systematic reviews and meta-analyses, we will conduct an overview of systematic reviews.

Methods and analysis

This is a protocol for an overview of systematic reviews. We will search five databases: MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science Core Collection, PubMed (for prepublication, in process and non-Medline records) and Google Scholar. We will consider systematic reviews and meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials evaluating the effect of haemoglobin thresholds for red blood cell transfusion on mortality. Two authors will independently screen titles and abstracts retrieved in the literature search and select studies meeting the eligibility criteria for full-text review. We will extract data onto a predefined form designed to summarise the key characteristics of each review. We will assess the methodological quality of included reviews and the quality of evidence in included reviews.

Ethics and dissemination

Formal ethics approval is not required for this overview as we will only analyse published literature. The findings of this study will be presented at relevant conferences and submitted for peer-review publication. The results are likely to be used by clinicians, policy makers and developers of clinical guidelines and will inform suggestions for future systematic reviews and randomised controlled trials.

PROSPERO registration number

CRD42019120503.

Frailty Levels In Geriatric Hospital paTients (FLIGHT)--the prevalence of frailty among geriatric populations within hospital ward settings: a systematic review protocol

Por: Doody · P. · Aunger · J. · Asamane · E. · Greig · C. A. · Lord · J. · Whittaker · A.
Introduction

Frailty is a common and clinically significant condition in geriatric populations, associated with adverse health outcomes such as hospitalisation, disability and mortality. Although there are systematic reviews/meta-analyses assessing the prevalence of frailty in community-dwelling older adults, nursing home residents, and cancer and general surgery patients, there are none assessing the overall prevalence of frailty in geriatric hospital inpatients.

Methods and analysis

This review will systematically search and analyse the prevalence of frailty within geriatric hospital inpatients within the literature. A search will be employed on the platforms of Ovid, Web of Science and databases of Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) Plus, SCOPUS and the Cochrane Library. Any observational or experimental study design which utilises a validated operational definition of frailty, reports the prevalence of frailty, has a minimum age ≥65 years, attempts to assess the whole ward/clinical population and occurs in hospital inpatients, will be included. Title and abstract and full-text screenings will be conducted by three reviewers. Methodological quality of eligible studies will be assessed using the Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal tool. Data extraction will be performed by two reviewers. If sufficient data are available, a meta-analysis synthesising pooled estimates of the prevalence of frailty and pre-frailty, as well as the prevalence of frailty stratified by age, sex, operational frailty definition, prevalent morbidities, ward type and location, among older hospitalised inpatients will be conducted. Clinical heterogeneity will be assessed by two reviewers. Statistical heterogeneity will be assessed through a Cochran Q test, and an I2 test performed to assess its magnitude.

Ethics and dissemination

Ethical approval was not required as primary data will not be collected. Findings will be disseminated through publication in peer reviewed open access scientific journals, public engagement events, conference presentations and social media.

PROSPERO registration number

79202.

Access delays to essential surgical care using the Three Delays Framework and Bellwether procedures at Timor Lestes national referral hospital

Por: Bagguley · D. · Fordyce · A. · Guterres · J. · Soares · A. · Valadares · E. · Guest · G. D. · Watters · D.
Objectives

Our objectives were to characterise the nature and extent of delay times to essential surgical care in a developing nation by measuring the actual stages of delay for patients receiving Bellwether procedures.

Setting

The study was conducted at Timor Leste’s national referral hospital in Dili, the country’s capital.

Participants

All patients requiring a Bellwether procedure over a 2-month period were included in the study. Participants whose procedure was undertaken more than 24 hours from initial hospital presentation were excluded.

Primary and secondary outcome measures

Data pertaining to the patient journey from onset of symptoms to emergency procedure was collected by interview of patients, their treating surgeons or anaesthetists and the medical records. Timelines were then calculated against the Three Delays Framework.

Results

Fifty-six patients were entered into the study. Their mean delay from symptom onset to entering the anaesthesia bay for a procedure was 32.3 hours (+/-11.6). The second delay (4.1+/-2.5 hours) was significantly less than the first (20.9+/-11.5 hours; p

Conclusions

Substantial delays were observed for all three stages and each Bellwether procedure. This study methodology could be used to measure access and the three delays to emergency surgical care in low/middle-income countries, although the actual reasons for delay may vary between regions and countries and would require a qualitative study.

Epidemiological characteristics of elevated blood pressure among middle and high school students aged 12-17 years: a cross-sectional study in Jiangsu Province, China, 2017-2018

Por: Zhang · X. · Yang · J. · Wang · Y. · Liu · W. · Yang · W. · Gao · L. · Schwertz · R. · Welker · A. · Zhang · F. · Zhou · Y.
Objective

In this study, we aimed to present the epidemiological characteristics of elevated blood pressure among middle and high school students aged 12–17 years in Jiangsu Province.

Setting

Hypertension, which is considered a rare disease in children, is an important early precursor to long-term cardiovascular damage, and elevated blood pressure in childhood is a strong predictor of hypertension in adulthood.

Participants

Physical examination and questionnaire investigation among children aged 12–17 years in Jiangsu Province were conducted from 2017 to 2018.

Main outcome measures

Physical measurements included height, weight, blood pressure and history of menarche/first spermatorrhoea. Questionnaire investigation included family type, delivery mode, lifestyle habits and psychological test.

Results

In our study we investigated 17 791 middle and high school students, consisting of 8701 female students and 9090 male students. The prevalence of screening elevated blood pressure among students aged 12–17 years was 20.0% (95% CI 19.2% to 20.9%) for female students and 22.3% (95% CI 21.5% to 23.2%) for male students. The prevalence of screening elevated blood pressure for urban male middle and high school students was higher than that of elevated blood pressure for rural male middle and high school students. However, similar phenomenon cannot be observed among female students. For both male and female students, body mass index (BMI), obesity/overweight and menarche/first spermatorrhoea can be a risk factor contributing to elevated blood pressure, and sleep time and regional distribution might be important factors that need to be investigated in depth.

Conclusion

We found a relatively high prevalence of screening elevated blood pressure among students aged 12–17 years for both female and male students in Jiangsu Province. The risk factors can be BMI, obesity/overweight and menarche/first spermatorrhoea.

Impact of Ramadan fasting on kidney function and related outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease: a systematic review protocol

Por: Bello · A. K. · Kurzawa · J. · Osman · M. A. · Olah · M. E. · Lloyd · A. · Wiebe · N. · Habib · S. · Qarni · U. · Shojai · S. · Pauly · R. P.
Introduction

Fasting during the month of Ramadan is a significant Islamic religious practice that involves abstinence from food, drink and medication from dawn to dusk. As just under a quarter of the world’s population identifies as Muslim, the effect of fasting on chronic conditions, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a topic of broad relevance. To date, the information in this area has been mixed, with many limitations of previous studies. This study aims to synthesise the evidence of the effect of Ramadan fasting on changes on kidney function, risk factors, episodes of acute kidney injury and impact on the quality of life in patients with CKD or kidney transplant.

Methods and analysis

A systematic review of the literature will be conducted, using electronic databases such as MEDLINE, Embase, Global Health, CINAHL and Scopus. Original research and grey literature on the effect of Ramadan fasting in adult patients with CKD or renal transplantation will be included. Two reviewers will independently screen articles for inclusion in the review and independently assess the methodology of included studies using a customised checklist. Mean difference or risk ratio will be reported for continuous or dichotomous outcomes and results will be pooled using a random-effects model where heterogeneity is reasonable. If possible, subgroups (CKD status, setting, season and risk of bias) will be analysed for effect modification with fasting and the outcomes of interest. Risk of bias will be assessed using the Downs and Black checklist.

Ethics and dissemination

The results will be disseminated using a multifaceted approach to engage all stakeholders (patients, practitioners and community leaders). Research ethics board approval is not required as this is a systematic review of previously published research.

PROSPERO registration number

CRD42018088973.

Global health competencies in UK postgraduate medical training: a scoping review and curricular content analysis

Por: Al-Shakarchi · N. · Obolensky · L. · Walpole · S. · Hemingway · H. · Banerjee · A.
Objective

To assess global health (GH) training in all postgraduate medical education in the UK.

Design

Mixed methodology: scoping review and curricular content analysis using two GH competency frameworks.

Setting and participants

A scoping review (until December 2017) was used to develop a framework of GH competencies for doctors. National postgraduate medical training curricula were analysed against this and a prior framework for GH competencies. The number of core competencies addressed and/or appearing in each programme was recorded.

Outcomes

The scoping review identified eight relevant publications. A 16-competency framework was developed and, with a prior 5-competency framework, used to analyse each of 71 postgraduate medical curricula. Curricula were examined by a team of researchers and relevant learning outcomes were coded as one of the 5 or 16 core competencies. The number of core competencies in each programme was recorded.

Results

Using the 5-competency and 16-competency frameworks, 23 and 20, respectively, out of 71 programmes contained no global health competencies, most notably the Foundation Programme (equivalent to internship), a compulsory programme for UK medical graduates. Of a possible 16 competencies, the mean number across all 71 programmes was 1.73 (95% CI 1.42 to 2.04) and the highest number were in paediatrics and infectious diseases, each with five competencies. Of the 16 core competencies, global burden of disease and socioeconomic determinants of health were the two most cited with 47 and 35 citations, respectively. 8/16 competencies were not cited in any curriculum.

Conclusions

Equity of care and the challenges of practising in an increasingly globalised world necessitate GH competencies for all doctors. Across the whole of postgraduate training, the majority of UK doctors are receiving minimal or no training in GH. Our GH competency framework can be used to map and plan integration across postgraduate programmes.

Association between adverse childhood experiences and adult diseases in older adults: a comparative cross-sectional study in Japan and Finland

Por: Amemiya · A. · Fujiwara · T. · Shirai · K. · Kondo · K. · Oksanen · T. · Pentti · J. · Vahtera · J.
Objective

We aimed to examine the association between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and diseases in older adults in Japan and Finland.

Design

Cross-sectional comparative study.

Setting

Data from a gerontological study in Japan and two public health studies in Finland were evaluated.

Participants

A total of 13 123 adults (mean age, 69.5 years) from Japan and 10 353 adults (mean age, 64.4 years) from Finland were included in this study. Logistic regression was used to examine the association of each of, any of and the cumulative number of ACEs (parental divorce, fear of a family member and poverty in childhood; treated as ordered categorical variables) with poor self-rated health (SRH), cancer, heart disease or stroke, diabetes mellitus, smoking and body mass index. Models were adjusted for sex, age, education, marital status and working status.

Results

Of the respondents, 50% of those in Japan and 37% of those in Finland reported having experienced at least one of the measured ACEs. Number of ACEs was associated with poor SRH in both countries, and the point estimates were similar (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.25 to 1.46 in Japan; OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 1.27 to 1.41 in Finland). Number of ACEs was associated with the prevalence of cancer, heart disease or stroke, diabetes mellitus, current smoking and an increase in body mass index in both countries.

Conclusions

The association between ACEs and poor SRH, adult diseases and health behaviours was similar among older adults in both Japan and Finland. This international comparative study suggests that the impact of ACEs on health is noteworthy and consistent across cultural and social environments.

The utility of Ki-67 as a prognostic biomarker in pulmonary neuroendocrine tumours: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

Por: Naheed · S. · Holden · C. · Tanno · L. · Jaynes · E. · Cave · J. · Ottensmeier · C. H. · Pelosi · G.
Introduction

The omission of the immunohistochemical proliferation marker Ki-67 labelling index (henceforth, simply Ki-67) from the 2015 WHO classification system of pulmonary neuroendocrine tumours (Lung-NETs) as a prognostic and grading criterion remains controversial. This systematic review along with meta-analysis will be conducted to assess the prognostic/grading utility of Ki-67 in Lung-NETs.

Methods

This systematic review will be conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines. A systematic search of MEDLINE Ovid, Embase, Scopus and the Cochrane Library will be performed from the inception of each database to 28 February 2019 for studies investigating any role of Ki-67 in Lung-NETs. Only full papers published in English detailing survival outcomes and HRs according to Ki-67 will be included. The primary endpoint will be establishing whether Ki-67 is a reliable marker in determining prognosis and thus assessing grade of Lung-NETs patients.

Ethics and dissemination

Ethical approval will not be required as this is an academic review of published literature. Findings will be disseminated through the preparation of a manuscript for publication in a peer-reviewed journal as well as presentation at national and international conferences.

PROSPERO registration number

CRD42018093389

Media Coverage of the Benefits and Harms of Testing the Healthy: a protocol for a descriptive study

Por: O'Keeffe · M. · Barratt · A. · Maher · C. · Zadro · J. · Fabbri · A. · Jones · M. · Moynihan · R.
Introduction

Much testing in medicine is aimed at healthy people to facilitate the early detection of health conditions. However, there is growing evidence that early detection is a double-edged sword that may cause harm in the form of overdiagnosis. The media can be seen as a major generator of consumer demand for health services. Previous research shows that media coverage tends to overstate the benefits and downplay the harms of medical interventions for the sick, and often fails to cover relevant conflicts of interest of those promoting those interventions. However, little is known about how the benefits and harms of testing the healthy are covered by media. This study will examine the media coverage of the benefits and harms of testing the healthy, and coverage of potential conflicts of interest of those promoting the testing.

Methods and analysis

We will examine five tests: 3D mammography for the early detection of breast cancer; blood liquid biopsy for the early detection of cancer; blood biomarker tests for the early detection of dementia; artificial intelligence technology for the early detection of dementia; and the Apple Watch Series 4 electrocardiogram sensor for the early detection of atrial fibrillation. We will identify media coverage using Google News and the LexisNexis and ProQuest electronic databases. Sets of two independent reviewers will conduct story screening and coding. We will include English language media stories referring to any of the five tests from January 2016 to May 2019. We will include media stories if they refer to any benefits or harms of the test for our conditions of interest. Data will be analysed using categorical data analysis and multinomial logistic regression.

Ethics and dissemination

No ethical approval is required for this study. Results will be presented at relevant scientific conferences and in peer-reviewed literature.

Correction: paediatric goal management training in patients with acquired brain injury: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

Hypher RE, Brandt AE, Risnes K, et al. Paediatric goal management training in patients with acquired brain injury: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. BMJ Open 2019;9:e029273. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-029273

The previous version of this manuscript left out some information regarding Co-authorship.

Authors, Ruth Elizabeth Hypher and Anne Elisabeth Brandt are joint first authors and contributed equally to this paper.

Phenylketonuria incidence in China between 2013 and 2017 based on data from the Chinese newborn screening information system: a descriptive study

Por: Xiang · L. · Tao · J. · Deng · K. · Li · X. · Li · Q. · Yuan · X. · Liang · J. · Yu · E. · Wang · M. · Wang · H. · Liu · H. · Zhu · J.
Objective

This study examines the incidence and spatial clustering of phenylketonuria (PKU) in China between 2013 and 2017.

Methods

Data from the Chinese Newborn Screening Information System were analysed to assess PKU incidence with 95% CIs by province, region and disease severity. Spatial clustering of PKU cases was analysed using global and local spatial autocorrelation analysis in the geographic information system.

Results

The database contained 4925 neonates with confirmed PKU during the study period, corresponding to an incidence of 6.28 (95% CI: 6.11 to 6.46) per 100 000 neonates screened. Incidence was highest in the provinces of Gansu, Ningxia and Qinghai, where it ranged from 19.00 to 28.63 per 100 000 neonates screened. Overall incidence was higher in the northern part of the country, where classical disease predominated, than in the southern part, where mild disease predominated. PKU cases clustered spatially (global Moran’s I=0.3603, Z=5.3097, p

Conclusions

China shows an intermediate PKU incidence among countries, and incidence differs substantially among Chinese provinces and between northern and southern regions. Our results suggest the need to focus efforts on screening, diagnosing and treating PKU in high-incidence provinces.

Addressing the polypharmacy challenge in older people with multimorbidity (APOLLO-MM): study protocol for an in-depth ethnographic case study in primary care

Por: Swinglehurst · D. · Fudge · N.
Introduction

Polypharmacy is on the rise. It is burdensome for patients and is a common source of error and adverse drug reactions, especially among older adults. Health policy advises clinicians to practice medicines optimisation—a person-centred approach to safe, effective medicines use. There has been little research exploring older patients’ perspectives and priorities around medicines-taking or their actual practices of fitting medicines into their daily lives and how these are shaped by the wider context of healthcare.

Methods and analysis

We will conduct an in-depth multisite ethnographic case study. The study is based in seven clinical sites (three general practices and four community pharmacies) and includes longitudinal ethnographic follow-up of older adults, organisational ethnography and participatory methods. Main data sources include field notes of observations in the home and clinical settings; interviews with patients and professionals; cultural probe activities; video recordings of clinical consultations and interprofessional talk; documents. Our analysis will illuminate the everyday practices of polypharmacy from a range of lay and professional perspectives; the institutional contexts within which these practices play out and the sense-making work that sustains—or challenges—these practices. Our research will adopt a ‘practice theory’ lens, drawing on the sociology of organisational routines and other relevant social theory guided by ongoing iterative data analysis.

Ethics approval

The study has HRA approval and received a favourable ethical opinion from the Leeds West Research Ethics Committee (IRAS project ID: 205517; REC reference 16/YH/0462).

Dissemination

Aside from academic outputs, our findings will inform the development of recommendations for practice and policy including an interactive e-learning resource. We will also work with service users to co-design patient/public engagement resources.

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